SecurityGateway 4.5.1 – With Integrated Encryption, Tracking & E-Sign with RMail!

I’m happy to announce the release of SecurityGateway 4.5.1. Though this is only considered a point (.1) release, it packs a big punch with the newly-added RMail features from RPost. With RMail, you can:

  • Track your important emails and know precisely when they’re delivered and opened.
  • Receive Proof of Delivery, Time, and Exact Content.
  • Easily encrypt sensitive emails and attachments for security or legal compliance.
  • RMail™ makes it easy for all parties to e-sign and complete a transaction, as well as to determine when a message has been delivered and opened.
Encrypt, E-sign, SecurityGateway
RMail Encryption, Signing, Proof of Delivery

For more information on the latest features and enhancements, or to download the latest SecurityGateway with RMail support, visit our downloads page.

As always, you can leave a comment if you have questions!

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Encryption Options for Keeping Your Private Email Messages Safe

Email encryption options with MDaemonIs your company prepared for the next big data breach? According to a study by Ponemon Institute, which surveyed 567 executives in the United States on how prepared they think their companies are to respond to a data breach, the following findings were made:

  1. Most respondents believe their companies are not prepared to deal with the consequences of a data breach.
  2. Most companies have data breach response plans, but they are ineffective.
  3. Data breach response plans are often not effective because they are not reviewed in a timely manner.
  4. Data breach detection technologies are rarely deployed.

Also, consider these startling enterprise email security statistics from Virtru’s blog:

  1. 87% of senior managers upload business files to a personal email or cloud account.
  2. Email malware creation is up 26% year over year, with 317 million new pieces of malware created in 2014.
  3. Hackers targeted 5 out of 6 large companies using email attacks last year — an annual increase of 40%.
  4. Cybercrime has a 1,425% ROI.

With the proliferation of data theft and compromised systems, more companies are addressing data privacy concerns via a renewed focus on security and encryption technology.

To address these data privacy and security concerns, MDaemon administrators and users have three options for keeping confidential email messages and attachments secure – SSL/TLS, Virtru, and OpenPGP. When an email message is sent, SSL or TLS is used to encrypt the connection from the mail client to the server or from the sending mail server to receiving mail server. Virtru provides end-to-end message and attachment encryption, and OpenPGP provides server-side encryption and key management as well as client-side encryption (when used with an OpenPGP plug-in on the mail client).

Encrypting the Connection with SSL or TLS

When you use POP or IMAP to retrieve your email messages, your username and password are transmitted in clear-text across the internet. This means that anyone using the same network or wireless connection as you, or anyone who has access to internet traffic at your ISP, can potentially intercept your data and read your login credentials. A hacker with malicious intent can then read your email, steal confidential information, or send out thousands of spam messages from your account. Your email credentials are valuable to spammers because the success rate of their solicitations is much greater than if they had simply forged the return-path of the message (which is characteristic of most spam messages).

One method for preventing hackers from being able to “sniff out” private data that’s in transit over the network is to use SSL or TLS. SSL and TLS are methods for encrypting the connection between two mail servers (SMTP) or between the mail server & mail client (POP & IMAP). In other words, the communication channel is encrypted – not the email message itself. A good explanation of SSL can be found here: https://www.digicert.com/ssl.htm

Normally, SMTP traffic is sent from client-to-server or server-to-server over port 25, but if you’d like the SMTP connection to be encrypted using SSL, by default you can configure your mail client to send outbound SMTP traffic over port 465, and you can also configure MDaemon or SecurityGateway to use port 465. Likewise, the default POP3 SSL port is 995, and the default IMAP SSL port is 993.

This knowledge base article contains instructions for configuring SSL features for SMTP, POP, and IMAP for MDaemon.
http://www.altn.com/Support/KnowledgeBase/KnowledgeBaseResults/?Number=841

This knowledge base article explains how to configure SSL features for SMTP & HTTP in SecurityGateway:
http://www.altn.com/Support/KnowledgeBase/KnowledgeBaseResults/?Number=481

When SSL or TLS is used, the data itself is not encrypted, but the connection is. If you’d like the data itself to be encrypted, then continue reading for how to encrypt email messages and attachments using Virtru and OpenPGP.

Client-Side Message & Attachment Encryption with Virtru

While SSL & TLS encrypt the connection, Virtru (included with MDaemon) encrypts the actual email message. Virtru provides end-to-end encryption – meaning the message is encrypted on the sending client and decrypted on the receiving client. Messages encrypted via Virtru are stored in their encrypted state on the server and cannot be decrypted without the proper keys. Virtru is included with MDaemon.

Click here for more information on Virtru.

Server-Side Message & Attachment Encryption with OpenPGP

With OpenPGP, messages are encrypted on the server, but they can also be encrypted on the mail client if an OpenPGP plug-in has been installed. The MDaemon administrator enables the OpenPGP features, creates public & private keys for users, and selects users who are allowed to use OpenPGP. Use the MDPGP configuration screen (located under the Security menu) to configure automatic encryption & key exchange, encryption key size and expiration, and to import keys. You can also create content filter rules to encrypt messages that meet specific criteria using OpenPGP.

This knowledge base article contains step-by-step instructions for enabling MDaemon’s OpenPGP features, configuring who can use it, and creating public & private keys for users.

Are These Features Easy to Use?

SSL and TLS are enabled by simply enabling the SSL ports on the mail server and configuring your mail client to use the SSL ports.

With Virtru, you’re up and running by simply enabling the feature in WorldClient. When you enable Virtru in WorldClient, your request is first sent to Virtru for processing. Within seconds, you’ll receive a pop-up message indicating that Virtru is now ready to start encrypting and decrypting your messages and message attachments. It’s that simple!

And for OpenPGP, options are available to help automate the encryption, decryption, and key import/exchange processes.

Conclusion

To recap, SSL & TLS can be used to help prevent eavesdropping on your email communication channel by encrypting the connection, while Virtru & OpenPGP can be used to help keep your email messages safe from unauthorized access by encrypting the actual email messages and attachments. Together, these security measures help to ensure that your confidential business data remains safe from unauthorized access.

Are you ready to ensure your important business communications are safe from prying eyes? Then download MDaemon and get started with SSL, Virtru, and OpenPGP!

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Your Unencrypted Data is a Gold Mine for Hackers

How often have you heard someone say “If you’re not doing anything illegal, then you have nothing to hide?” When asked this, I tend to respond with, “OK, then how about you give me the login credentials for all of your email accounts, including the ones you use for personal use?” I think of this as analogous to allowing a stranger to walk around in your house. Hey, it’s OK as long as you’ve got nothing to hide, right? The point is that, no matter what is contained in our electronic data, most of us want peace of mind in knowing that it isn’t being accessed by unauthorized individuals.

This concern for privacy doesn’t just apply to individuals. It applies to businesses as well. Businesses rely on electronic communication to send sensitive information such as invoices, employee records, financial reports, and other confidential data. In fact, businesses currently send more than 100 billion emails each day, and that number is projected to skyrocket to almost 140 billion emails a day in another year. If this information gets into the wrong hands, it can lead to devastating losses for the company, as well as damage to its reputation. For example, in 2013 and 2014, Target suffered breaches of approximately 110 million customer records in two separate attacks. Earlier last year, a security expert discovered that 272.3 million accounts had been stolen from Google, Yahoo, Microsoft, and Mail.ru (Russia’s most popular email service). In 2013, Yahoo suffered a breach that is believed to have impacted over 1 billion users. In September of 2016, at least 500 million Yahoo user accounts were compromised in a massive data breach that may have included names, email addresses, phone numbers, birthdates, and hashed passwords. In 2012, 165 million LinkedIn accounts were compromised. Though different attack vectors may have been used in each of these cases, the targeted information could have been safeguarded if it had been encrypted. Moreover, all it takes is for one host to be infected with malware to allow the interception and eavesdropping of confidential email content.

Breaches perpetrated by hackers aren’t the only threat to a company’s data. User error also poses a significant threat. According to the whitepaper “Content Encryption – Key Issues to Consider” from Osterman Research, these examples of users mistakenly sending unencrypted content were cited:

  • An employee at Nationstar Mortgage mistakenly emailed copies of customers’ W-2 forms to an employee at Greenlight Mortgage, revealing Social Security numbers, names, addresses and other sensitive information.
  • 845 patients of Tulare County Health received information on how to access protected health information (PHI) via the administration’s medical portal due to an employee mistake.
  • Graduate students at the South Dakota School of Mines and Technology were inadvertently sent an email attachment that included the student identification numbers, grade point averages and other information of about 350 fellow students.

The costs of not sufficiently protecting your data are high. The findings from a study conducted by the Ponemon Institute show that the average cost of a security breach in the United States was $201 per compromised data record – $32 for detecting the breach and notifying the affected individuals, $55 for damage control costs including legal fees, investigations, fines and remediation, and $114 in loss of business due to customer abandonment. Regulated industries such as healthcare and financial services have the most costly data breaches due to fines and the higher than average rate of lost business and customers. In addition to financial losses, companies may also suffer damage to their reputation.

How could these incidents have been prevented? If these businesses had encrypted their data, they could have prevented unauthorized access to confidential information in the event of a breach. Encryption helps protect corporate and financial data of companies, as well as the personal data of their employees and customers. When data is encrypted, even if a user’s account has been hacked, the data would still be unreadable. Encryption also helps companies meet strict regulations such as FERPA, GLBA, and PCI compliance. Encryption solutions also offer the benefit of proof of identity when email messages are digitally signed, ensuring that the message is authentic and verified as having been sent from the purported sender.

A common misconception about email encryption is that it is only needed for larger businesses; however, small and medium size businesses are targeted just as frequently as large ones, and often can be affected much more severely in the event of an email hack. While a larger company may be able to financially survive a breach (but still at significant loss), a severe data breach could put a small company out of business. This is just one of many reasons why encryption is so important.

One of the most common challenges for email encryption is that it has had a reputation of being difficult to use, often requiring cumbersome key exchanges and extensive configuration. MDaemon’s client-side encryption feature (via Virtru) and server-side encryption (via OpenPGP) were designed for convenience and ease of use.

Virtru’s client-side encryption service is built into WorldClient, MDaemon’s webmail client. Setup is as easy as checking a box and verifying your identity. Once enabled, you can simply follow the steps outlined on this page to encrypt your messages. For server-side encryption, MDaemon’s OpenPGP settings make it easy to automate encryption of messages as they pass through the server. Administrators can follow steps outlined in this knowledge base article to enable OpenPGP, configure who can use it, and create keys for their users. This post includes a tutorial video on how to use the OpenPGP features in MDaemon, including how to encrypt an email message using special commands in the subject line, as well as how to automate the encryption process using the content filter.

No business is too small to protect its sensitive data from theft. If you’d like to ensure your company’s emails and attachments are safe, you should always encrypt. A few extra steps now can safe a great deal of headache later.

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SSL & TLS Best Practices

You may have heard the terms SSL and TLS, but do you know what they are and how they’re different?

SSL (Secure Sockets Layer) and TLS (Transport Layer Security) are methods of securing (encrypting) the connection between a mail client and mail server (Outlook and MDaemon, for example) or between mail servers (MDaemon and another mail server, for example). They are also methods for securing communications between websites and your browser. In this post, we’ll focus on its uses for encrypting email connections.

Without SSL or TLS, data sent between mail clients and servers would be sent in plain text. This potentially opens up your business to theft of confidential information, credentials being stolen and accounts being used to send spam. SSL and TLS can be used to help protect that data. SSL and TLS allow users to securely transmit sensitive information such as social security numbers, credit card numbers, or medical information via email.

How do SSL and TLS work?

In order to use SSL or TLS, you’ll need an SSL certificate to establish an SSL/TLS connection. SSL certificates use a key pair (a public and private key) to establish a secure connection. When a mail client or server wants to connect to another server using SSL, an SSL connection is established using what’s known as an “SSL handshake.” During this process, three keys are used to establish an SSL connection – a public key, a private key, and a session key. Data encrypted with the public key can only be decrypted with the corresponding private key, and vice-versa. Encryption via the public & private keys only takes place during the SSL handshake to create a symmetric session key. Once the secure connection is made, all transmitted data is encrypted with the session key.

This diagram provides a simplified overview of how an SSL connection is established.

How SSL & TLS workBoth SSL and TLS protect data privacy through data-in-motion encryption, provide server-side and (optionally) client-side encryption of the communication channel, and help ensure message integrity.

POP, IMAP and SMTP traffic are transmitted over designated ports. By default, IMAP uses port 143, POP uses port 110, and SMTP uses port 25. IMAP over SSL/TLS uses port 993. POP over SSL/TLS uses port 995, and SMTP over SSL/TLS uses port 465. For SSL to take place over these connection types, the mail client and mail server must both be configured to use the proper ports, and a valid SSL certificate must be installed on the server.

What are the Differences between SSL and TLS?

So what are the differences between SSL and TLS? TLS is the successor to SSL. It was introduced in 1999 as an upgrade to SSL 3.0, so TLS 1.0 is most similar to SSL 3.0 & is sometimes referred to as SSL 3.1, though TLS is not compatible with SSL 3.0. The version numbers for SSL are 1.0, 2.0 and 3.0, while TLS uses a different numbering pattern – 1.0, 1.1, 1.2.

Because TLS is incompatible with SSL 3.0, the client and server must agree on which protocol to use. This is accomplished via what’s known as a “handshake.” If TLS cannot be used, the connection may fall back to SSL 3.0.

Without getting too technical (there are plenty of online resources that explain the technical differences between SSL and TLS), here are some of the differences between SSL and TLS:

TLS has more alert descriptions – When a problem is encountered with an SSL or TLS connection, the party who encountered the problem would send an alert message.

SSL had the following 12 alert messages:

  • Close Notify
  • Unexpected Message
  • Bad Record MAC
  • Decompression Failure
  • Handshake Failure
  • No Certificate
  • Bad Certificate
  • Unsupported Certificate
  • Certificate Revoked
  • Certificate Expired
  • Certificate Unknown
  • Illegal Parameter

TLS has the following additional alert messages:

  • Decryption Failed
  • Record Overflow
  • Unknown CA (Certificate Authority)
  • Access Denied
  • Decode Error
  • Decrypt Error
  • Export Restriction
  • Protocol Version
  • Insufficient Security
  • Internal Error
  • User Canceled
  • No Renegotiation
  • Unsupported Extension
  • Certificate Unobtainable
  • Unrecognized Name
  • Bad Certificate Status Response
  • Bad Certificate Hash Value
  • Unknown PSK
  • No Application Protocol

TLS uses HMAC for message authentication – SSL verifies message integrity (to determine whether a message has been altered) using Message Authentication Codes (MACs) that use either MD5 or SHA. TLS, on the other hand, uses HMAC, allowing it to work with a wider variety of hash functions – not just MD5 and SHA.

TLS uses a different set of cipher suites.

A cipher suite is basically a combination of authentication, encryption, message authentication code (MAC) and key exchange algorithms used to negotiate security settings for a network connection. More information can be found here: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cipher_suite

Why are SSL and TLS Important?

Businesses have a responsibility to protect financial data such as credit card information, and consumer records such as names, addresses, phone numbers, and medical information. Without some form of encryption, whether via an encrypted connection using SSL & TLS, or by encrypting the message itself using Virtru or OpenPGP, sensitive data may be vulnerable to hackers & other forms of unauthorized access.

Which method is recommended?

SSL 3.0 suffers from a well-known vulnerability called the POODLE vulnerability. POODLE stands for Padding Oracle On Downgraded Legacy Encryption. Click here for a thorough overview of this vulnerability and recommended actions.  One workaround recommended in the overview is to completely disable the SSL 3.0 protocol on the mail client and server. This might not be practical, as it may affect legacy systems that are still using SSL 3.0.

We recommend using TLS whenever possible. TLS 1.2 is currently the best version for security, but it is not yet universally supported. TLS 1.1+ support was not added until Windows 7 and Server 2008 R2, in 2009.

The encryption protocol and cipher used by MDaemon and SecurityGateway depend on the operating system and can be configured via the registry. You can use the free IIS Crypto tool to set the appropriate registry keys. More information can be found here:
https://www.nartac.com/Products/IISCrypto

I hope this information helps clarify any questions about SSL and TLS, and which encryption method is recommended. As always, if you have questions or comments, let us know!

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Encrypting vs. Signing with OpenPGP. What’s the Difference?

Many businesses are responsible for maintaining large amounts of confidential data, including customer records, medical records, financial reports, legal documents, and much more. It’s very common for these types of information to be transmitted via email. So how can you ensure confidential data transmitted via email is kept private? How can you ensure the integrity of transmitted data and that a message actually came from its purported sender?

Businesses need to ensure confidentiality, data integrity, message authentication (proof of origin), and non-repudiation (proof of content and its origin). These goals can be accomplished using MDaemon’s OpenPGP message encryption and signing services. Read on to learn more about the differences between encrypting and signing, and when each is used.

The Need for Encryption

 Businesses need to protect sensitive data and preserve confidentiality and privacy. Whether you work in healthcare, finance, legal, HR or education, chances are you’re familiar with the terms HIPAA or FERPA (among others). Businesses that fail to meet these regulations risk data breaches that can lead to lost revenue or legal action. To address these issues, businesses can use encryption to make their sensitive data unreadable to unauthorized parties.

The Need for Signing

In addition to data privacy, businesses may need to ensure that a message was not altered during transit, and that it actually came from the purported sender. These tasks are accomplished with message signing (adding a digital signature) using OpenPGP. Much like your handwritten signature, a digital signature can be used for authentication purposes, but also cannot be forged.

Signing a message helps ensure the following:

  • Data Integrity – That the message was not altered from its original form.
  • Message Authentication (Proof of Origin) – That the message actually came from the purported sender.
  • Non-repudiation – That the sender cannot deny the authenticity of the message they sent and signed with OpenPGP.

Encrypting vs. Signing – What’s the Difference?

So what are the differences between encrypting & signing? Let’s discuss each.

What is Encryption?

Encryption is the act of converting plain text to cipher text. Cipher text is basically text that has been scrambled into non-readable format using an algorithm – called a cipher. MDaemon’s implementation of OpenPGP encryption uses public key encryption (also known as asymmetric key encryption) to encrypt email messages and attachments.

So How Does Public Key Encryption Work?

Public key encryption uses public/private key pairs. If you want me to send you an encrypted message, you send me your public key, which I import into my encryption software (using the OpenPGP configuration screen in MDaemon, in this case). I encrypt the message with your public key. When you receive the message, you decrypt it with your private key. Even though your public key can be freely distributed and used to encrypt messages addressed to you, these encrypted messages can only be decrypted with your own private key. This private key must always be kept secret. Data encrypted with the public key can only be decrypted with its corresponding private key; conversely, data encrypted with the private key can only be decrypted with its corresponding public key. We’ll talk about why you would encrypt a message with your own private key in the next section when we discuss message signing.

Encrypting email with OpenPGP
Encrypting email with OpenPGP

Encrypting a message helps ensure that the message is kept confidential. The message remains in its encrypted format until it is decrypted with the recipient’s private key.

What is Message Signing with OpenPGP?

As I mentioned above, messages are encrypted with the message recipient’s public key and decrypted with the corresponding private key. Message signing, on the other hand, uses the sender’s private key to sign (encrypt) the message, and his public key is used to read the signature (decrypt). Message signing binds the identity of the message source to the message. This helps ensure data integrity, message authentication, and non-repudiation.

For example, if John wants to digitally sign a message to Michelle, he uses his private key to encrypt the message, and sends it (along with his public key if it hasn’t already been sent) to Michelle. Since John’s public key is the only key that can decrypt the message, the digital signature is verified by simply decrypting the message with John’s public key.

Signing with OpenPGP
Signing an Email Message with OpenPGP

Signing a message with OpenPGP ensures that the message was not altered in transit, that it did in fact come from the purported sender, and that the sender cannot deny the authenticity of the message they sent and signed with OpenPGP.

Message encryption & key management are explained in this tutorial video:
https://youtu.be/2fjyAAcHpMs?list=PLt-aAHf-ocsb0xDLb930tnPZZ9A1J19VG

More information on using MDaemon’s PGP encryption & signing features can be found in the following knowledge base article:

How to enable MDaemon PGP, configure who can use MDPGP, and create keys for specific users

http://www.altn.com/Support/KnowledgeBase/KnowledgeBaseResults/?Number=1087

Do you have questions? Let us know in the Comments section below!

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For Security & Privacy – Easy Email & Attachment Encryption with Virtru

Recently, I created a video and blog post about Virtru Email Encryption for MDaemon, to demonstrate its features, benefits, and ease of use. Following along with its ease of use, I’ve created the following animation to show you just how easy Virtru is to use. Simply enable Virtru support in WorldClient (MDaemon’s webmail client), enable the Virtru features by clicking on the small “V” button within the email compose window, and then click on “Send Encrypted.” It really is that simple!

Virtru Email and Attachment Encryption
It’s easy to encrypt email and attachments using Virtru

For a more thorough overview of Virtru’s features, please see this blog post, or click here to visit our main Virtru page.

Virtru (email and attachment encryption) is included with the MDaemon Messaging Server. Virtru Pro features include Message Revoke, Disable Forwarding, Set Message Expiration, and automatic encryption. Click here if you’d like to purchase Virtru Pro.

Want to learn more about the encryption features offered by MDaemon? Then click here to learn more!

Protect your business from unauthorized access to your important and confidential email messages. Download your free trial of MDaemon today!

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Keeping Email Private with Virtru Client-Side Encryption

Have you ever created an account on a website that you wouldn’t want others to know about, or made travel arrangements, purchased personal items, or set a doctor’s appointment online? If so, then it’s possible that sensitive information about you has been transmitted via email. If any of these situations apply to you, or if you just don’t want anyone to see the cat photos you sent as an email attachment to your neighbor, then you should be encrypting your email. If you send personal or financial information, it’s best to assume that at any given time, someone out there is trying to gain access to that information.

Many small businesses think data breaches only happen to large companies, however, no company is too small to protect itself from outside threats. In fact, many hackers know that smaller companies might be a bit more lax in their security practices, and thus target them more aggressively. This is why email security and encryption are so important.

Virtru recently wrote a blog titled “Four Enterprise Security Statistics that Might Scare You Straight.” Here are some interesting statistics cited in the article:

  • 87% of Senior Managers Upload Business Files to a Personal Email or Cloud Account
  • Email Malware Creation is up 26% Year Over Year, with 317 Million New Pieces of Malware Created in 2014
  • Hackers Targeted 5 out of 6 Large Companies Using Email Attacks Last Year — an Annual Increase of 40%
  • Cybercrime has a 1,425% ROI

So with the above statistics in mind, do we even need to ask why we need encryption? If these reasons aren’t convincing enough, consider these:

  • Firewalls, antivirus, and anti-spyware may provide good protection, but they may not be enough. If one of the above is breached, encryption helps keep data safe.
  • Encryption can help shield businesses and users from government surveillance or other unauthorized access.
  • When you need to send sensitive data, encryption helps keep this data away from unauthorized viewers.
  • Encryption helps companies stay in compliance with HIPAA, CJIS, FERPA, and other government regulations.
  • Encryption helps keep sensitive data out of the hands of criminals and competitors.
  • Encryption helps companies preserve data integrity and privacy policies.

Client-side vs. Server-Side Encryption

Now that we’ve discussed why encryption is important, let’s discuss Virtru and its benefits.

First, we need to make a distinction between client-side and server-side encryption. With client-side encryption, email messages and attachments are encrypted by the sending mail client, and remain encrypted until an authorized recipient opens the message. With server-side encryption, messages and attachments are encrypted on the mail server with no user interaction. MDaemon users can use Virtru to encrypt messages on the client, and MDaemon administrators can use PGP to encrypt messages as they pass through the mail server. In this blog post, we’re going to focus on the client-side Virtru encryption features. If you’d like to learn more about MDaemon’s server-side encryption options using OpenPGP, then check out this blog post & video.

What is Virtru?

Virtru is an easy to use email encryption service that lets you protect private information while using your existing email service.  Encryption converts plain text into gibberish (cipher text) that is unreadable to all except the intended recipient. Virtru offers end-to-end encryption, ensuring that only authorized parties can decrypt your content.

When you send messages with Virtru, your emails and files are locked using strong encryption. Only you and your recipients can decrypt your messages. Separation of content and encryption gives you an extra level of privacy.

Why use Virtru?

Virtru was designed for user privacy and ease of use. Virtru never has access to your passwords and does not store any of your email content on their servers; only the encryption keys. Virtru helps users avoid headaches by managing their encryption keys for them.

Users have two versions of Virtru to choose from. The free version provides encryption and decryption of email and attachments. The Pro version provides the same encryption and decryption features, plus the ability to set message expiration dates, revoke emails, and disable forwarding.

Want to learn more about Virtru? Then  check out the video below for a demonstration, or visit the Virtru page on our website. You can also try out Virtru’s features by downloading your free trial of MDaemon.

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Server-side Encryption, Decryption & Key Management with OpenPGP

Whether you work in health care, finance, government, or any other field that requires the storage of data, there’s always someone out there who would love to gain access to your confidential records. Don’t let the bad guys steal your data. Protect it with server-side encryption. Our latest release of MDaemon supports OpenPGP, which allows MDaemon to perform encryption, decryption, and key management tasks. Learn how to enable OpenPGP support in MDaemon, and how to send encrypted mail in our latest video.

Click here to learn more about MDaemon’s email encryption features, or click here to download your free trial of MDaemon and see for yourself how easy it is to use!

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