Recent Business Email Compromise (BEC) Scams are Reminder to Educate Users

Online scams are nothing new. But as email has evolved and improved, so have scammers and the messages they send. Nefarious emails, attachments and links now appear sophisticated and look legitimate, sometimes tricking even the most meticulous user.

Billions Lost to Business Email Compromise

Over the last three years, organizations all over the world have lost a collective $26B to a very specific type of email scam – Business Email Compromise, or BEC. Recently, a BEC scheme in Spain was brought down, but not before taking over €10M. A scammer in Canada impersonated a contractor and fooled city employees out of over $1M. And the FBI is investigating a network of over 80 people across multiple countries in an attempt to use a BEC plot to steal $46M.

Why do BEC Scams Work so Well?

Top 10 Business Email Compromise Protection Tips
Top 10 Business Email Compromise Protection Tips

BEC emails are advanced phishing scams, and they’re on the rise. But what makes a BEC attack so dangerous, and so effective?

BEC Scams are Highly Targeted

Scammers aren’t blasting thousands of the same email. They’ve done the research, monitoring the company’s website and social pages. They find the appropriate target, and groom them by sending multiple conversational emails, establishing trust.

They Contain No Malware

Unlike the old style of phishing, where users are told to click on a link, BEC emails have no spammy links. This means they can sometimes evade spam filters, and the end user doesn’t see any red flags.

They Exploit Human Nature

BEC emails imitate an actual person, complete with real-looking email addresses, formatting, company names, and titles. The victim has unknowingly been emailing back and forth with the scammer and trusts that they are who they claim to be. So when asked to send bank information, for example, the victim assumes the request is authentic and complies.

They are Often Under-reported

Victims often don’t realize they made a mistake until much later. And even upon realization, many companies don’t report the incident for fear of damaging their reputation with their customers. Not reporting such incidents allows perpetrators to simply move on to their next victim.

Learn How to Stay Protected Against these Email Scams

Preventing losses to Business Email Compromise is the responsibility of both the end user and the IT administrator. To stay protected, follow these tips:

End Users:
  • Double-check the sender email address & recognize spoofing and other impersonation tactics. MDaemon Webmail displays the full email header to help users identify spoofed emails.

    MDaemon Webmail Full Email Header Display
    MDaemon Webmail Full Email Header Display
  • Don’t overshare on social media
  • Don’t open email from unknown sources
  • Verify all wire transfer requests via phone or face-to-face
  • Know customers’ & vendors’ business practices
  • Run antivirus software often
  • Use two-factor authentication
  • Forward, don’t reply. Ensures you manually enter the appropriate email address.
Administrators:
  • Enable reverse lookups to verify the legitimacy of the sender
  • Use the antivirus features in MDaemon and SecurityGateway to scan all inbound and outbound email traffic
  • Require users to use SMTP Authentication
  • Use SPF, DKIM & DMARC to secure your domain against spoofing
  • Require two-factor authentication
  • Require strong passwords
  • Provide regular end-user training
  • Run antivirus software often and make sure virus signatures are up-to-date

While traditional security measures such as network defenses and email gateways can be effective at blocking most varieties of spam, the bottom line is that the most critical part of stopping BEC attacks is user awareness and education.

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Security Gateway a High Performer Again – G2 Crowd 2019 Fall Report

We’re proG2 Crowd High Performer 2019ud to announce that Security Gateway for Email has once again been named a High Performer in Secure Email Gateways by G2 Crowd in their Fall Report. And if you are looking for a hosted solution, Security Gateway also was recognized as a top Cloud Email Security solution.

Security Gateway for Email Servers - High Performer 2019
Security Gateway for Email Servers – High Performer 2019

G2 Crowd awards are based on honest reviews from users. In other words, the product is recognized because of the feedback from users just like you who use the product every day; awards that reflect a superior customer experience.

The data from G2 Crowd speaks for itself – Security Gateway received satisfaction ratings above 90% in the Ease of Set Up, Ease of Use, Ease of Admin, and Quality of Support categories; ratings that exceed the category average scores.

Why Users Love Security Gateway

Easy to Use 

Security Gateway Review from G2 Crowd

SecurityGateway is designed to be simple and easy-to-use. Set-up, configuration and maintenance is easy for the administrator, and every-day tasks like accessing quarantine reports is easy for the end user.

Best Results

Security Gateway for Email Review - G2 Crowd

With SecurityGateway you get results, which means you DON’T get malicious emails in your inbox. We protect email communications for businesses of all sizes and verticals, regardless of which email platform they use and whether it’s in-house or in the cloud.

Reliable

Security Gateway Review

Try Security Gateway for Free and Compare its performance and Cost to Your Current Solution

Security Gateway is one of the best email security gateways in the market. Find out what organizations of all sizes already know – Security Gateway saves you time, headache and money.

Click here to learn how Security Gateway can protect your email!

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Phishing Email Uses Google Drive to Get Past Microsoft Security

Phishing, email scams, tips to avoid spear-phishing

This week, Threatpost reported on a new spear-phishing attack that uses email sent via Google Drive claiming to be the CEO of the targeted company sharing important information with the recipients.  The email came from Google Drive, but the sender address didn’t match the company’s standard naming convention for email addresses.

Because the message was sent by a legitimate email service, it was able to bypass Microsoft Exchange Online Protection on its way to users’ inboxes.

You can read the full article here.

No Spam Filter or Email Gateway can Block 100% of All Spam

Spam Filters and Email Gateways have proven quite effective at blocking most of the junk email that gets sent by the thousands on a daily basis, but cyber criminals are always looking for new ways to bypass email security measures through social engineering, new strains of malware, and newly-discovered security flaws reported in  Microsoft Exchange Server and cloud email platforms. That’s why user training will continue to be a top priority for all businesses that use  email.

Tips to Avoid Phishing and Business Email Compromise (BEC) Attacks

In a prior post, I listed the following 10 tips to avoid falling victim to phishing emails.. Here’s a brief summary. You can read the entire post here.

10 Tips to Identify a Phishing Email

  1. Watch out for messages disguised as something expected, like a shipment or payment notification.
  2. Watch for messages asking for personal information such as account numbers, Social Security numbers, and other personal information. Legitimate companies will never ask for this over email.
  3. Beware of urgent or threatening messages claiming that your account has been suspended and prompting you to click on a link to unlock your account.
  4. Check for poor grammar or spelling errors.
  5. Hover before you click!
  6. Check the Greeting – Is the message addressed to a generic recipient, such as “Valued customer” or “Sir/Madam?” If so, be careful & think twice!
  7. Check the Email Signature – In addition to the greeting, phishing emails often leave out important information in the signature. Legitimate businesses will always have accurate contact details in their signature, so if a message’s signature looks incomplete or inaccurate, chances are it’s spam.
  8. Don’t download Attachments
  9. Don’t trust the From address –Know the difference between the “envelope From” and the “header From” addresses.
  10. Don’t Enable Macros –  Never trust an email that asks you to enable macros before downloading a Word document.

These 10 tips are explained in more detail in this post.

10 Tips to Protect Against Business Email Compromise (BEC) Email Attacks

Business Email Compromise goes beyond standard spam techniques by exploiting human nature and the trust established between employees and members of the executive team. Scammers use social engineering, CEO impersonation, and a variety of other techniques to trick users in accounting, finance, or other high-power positions into transferring money into the scammer’s accounts. These attacks are well-executed and targeted at specific individuals, and often take more time to plan and launch due to the amount of research that goes into these attacks. Cyber criminals use publicly available information on sites such as LinkedIn, Facebook and even the website of the targeted victim to gain insight into the company’s business practices. They will often study the writing styles of the executive team, allowing them to craft convincing emails that appear authentic to employees.

Because Business Email Compromise attacks are often so well-crafted, they are able to bypass standard security measures. These tips should help you identify a Business Email Compromise attempt if one should slip through your spam filter or email gateway.

  1. Train Users to recognize these Common Impersonation Tactics used by Cybercriminals
    • Domain Name Spoofing
    • Display Name Spoofing
    • Lookalike Domain Spoofing
    • Compromised Account
  2. Secure your Domain by registering similar domains.
  3. Don’t Over-share on Social Media
  4. Use SPF, DKIM & DMARC to protect your domain from spoofing.
  5. Use Two-Factor Authentication
  6. Use Strong Passwords
  7. Don’t trust unknown sources
  8. Establish strict processes for wire transfers
  9. Provide regular end-user training
  10. Run antivirus software often

You can learn more on how to avoid Business Email Compromise attacks here.

No business is too big or too small to fall victim to email-borne scams. In fact, cyber criminals often target smaller businesses based on the assumption that smaller companies are less likely to have the latest security systems in place. MDaemon Email Server and Security Gateway for Email Servers include a variety of features to protect businesses from spam, malware, and leaks of sensitive business data.

15% discount during August, 2019 for MDaemon Email Server and Security Gateway for Email Servers

Looking for a secure, affordable email and collaboration server or email security gateway for your business? This month, we’re offering a 15% discount off the price of MDaemon Email Server (new purchases), and Security Gateway for Email Servers (new, renewal, and upgrades).

Comments? Question? Let us know. We’re here to help!

 

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10 Tips to Identify a Phishing Email

Don’t Risk Losing your Life Savings to Scammers. Follow these 10 Tips to Identify a Phishing Email.

Whether you run a Fortune-500 organization or a small boutique, by now you should be aware of the threats posed by cyber criminals to trick you into clicking a link, downloading an attachment, or parting ways with your money.

Modern day email scams are getting more sophisticated, leading to staggering losses for businesses of all sizes. According to the 2018 Verizon Data Breach Investigations Report, phishing was used in 93% of all reported breaches, with email being the main attack vector in 96% of reported cases.

While these figures are staggering, they continue to rise as scammers reap huge payouts from BEC (Business Email Compromise), CEO fraud and other phishing scams.

The real estate industry is a prime target for phishing because large sums of money change hands and there are various weak links in the transaction process. If any step within the transaction process becomes compromised with a successful phishing email, the attacker could gain access to a legitimate email address from which to launch other attacks. The fraudster could then lie in wait, scanning email messages for financial or transaction related details, and then send off fraudulent wire transfer instructions to an unsuspecting buyer, seller, or agent. For example, this happened to a 31 year-old first-time home buyer in San Antonio, Texas. You can read details about this case here, but the short version of the story is that she felt that she was in a time crunch to send in her down payment and finalize other closing tasks, and felt that the title company was dragging its feet. This state of high anxiety made her a prime target for a phishing email she received stating that she had previously been given the wrong wire transfer information, and that she needed to wire her down payment to a new account. With 5 hours left to get everything done, she attempted to contact her title company to confirm the change, but no one responded, so in a panic, she hastily ran to the bank and wire transferred her $52,000 down payment. Unfortunately, she sent her life savings to scammers.

The phishing industry is so lucrative for scammers because the barriers to entry are low relative to potential huge payouts. With botnets-for-hire and Malware as a Service (Maas), spammers have an impressive arsenal of tools at their disposal to propagate their campaigns, so to fight this scourge, an educated user is the best defense against phishing scams. With this in mind, here are my top 10 tips on how to identify and protect yourself from phishing attacks.

  1. Watch out for messages disguised as something expected, like a shipment or payment notification. These often contain links to malware sites. Hover your mouse over any links to make sure they’re safe. Think before you click! Here’s an example using a phishing email I received claiming to come from HSBC.

    Payment notification phishing email
    Watch for unexpected payment or shipment notices
  2. Watch for messages asking for personal information such as account numbers, Social Security numbers, and other personal information. Legitimate companies will never ask for this over email.
  3. Beware of urgent or threatening messages claiming that your account has been suspended and prompting you to click on a link to unlock your account.
  4. Check for poor grammar or spelling errors. While legitimate companies are very strict about emails they send out, Phishing emails often contain poor spelling or grammar.
  5. Hover before you click! Phishing emails often contain links to malware sites. Don’t trust the URL you see! Always hover your mouse over the link to view its real destination. If the link claims to point to a known, reputable site, it’s always safer to manually type the URL into your browser’s address bar.
  6. Check the Greeting – Is the message addressed to a generic recipient, such as “Valued customer” or “Sir/Madam?” If so, be careful & think twice! Legitimate businesses will often use your real first and last name. In our HSBC example, notice the generic greeting.

    Watch for generic greetings in email messages
    Watch for generic greetings in email messages
  7. Check the Signature – In addition to the greeting, phishing emails often leave out important information in the signature. Legitimate businesses will always have accurate contact details in their signature, so if a message’s signature looks incomplete or inaccurate, chances are it’s spam. In our HSBC example, the sender’s name and contact information are missing from the signature.

    Watch for generic signatures in phishing email messages.
    Watch for generic signatures in phishing email messages.
  8. Don’t download Attachments – With the proliferation of Ransomware as a Service (Raas), spammers have an easy mechanism for distributing malware-laden spam messages to thousands of users. And because the payout for ransomware can be quite high, even one successful ransomware infection could net the spammer large amounts of money. If there’s ANY doubt about the identity of the message sender or the contents of an attachment, play it safe and don’t download the attachment.
  9. Don’t trust the From address – Many phishing emails will have a forged sender address. The From address is displayed in two places. The Envelope From is used by mail servers to generate NDR messages, while the Header From is used by the email client to display information in the From field. Both of these headers can be spoofed. MDaemon Webmail has built-in security features to help users identify spoofed emails. Many mail clients hide the From address, only showing the From name, which can be easily spoofed. In MDaemon Webmail, the From address is always displayed, giving users a clearer view into the source of the email and helping them identify spoofed senders. Using our HSBC example, I’ve highlighted the actual sender.
    Phishing email highlighting the actual sending address
    Phishing email highlighting the actual sending address

    MDaemon Webmail will also display information in the Security tag to help users identify messages from verified senders, as shown here.

    MDaemon Webmail - DKIM-Verified Sender
    MDaemon Webmail – DKIM-Verified Sender
  10. Don’t Enable Macros – And while we’re on the subject of ransomware, another common vector for ransomware infections is through macros in Microsoft Word documents. These documents often arrive in phishing emails claiming to have important content from HR, Finance, or another important department, and to trick the user, they request the user to enable macros. Never trust an email that asks you to enable macros before downloading a Word document.

While anti-spam and anti-malware tools are quite effective at filtering out the majority of scams, there’s really no substitute for good old-fashioned user education. Know the potential costs to your business and don’t become the next victim!

If you’re the MDaemon or SecurityGateway administrator and need help with your security settings to help block as much phishing as possible before it reaches your users, give us a call or drop us an email support request.

 

 

 

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Another day, another attempt to scam me – but I know a phishing attempt when I see one!

Avoid phishing scamsIt’s just a fact of life: If there’s email, there will always be spam. Now, how much spam you have to deal with will depend on how good your spam filtering solution is. Here at MDaemon Technologies, we use our own products – MDaemon and Security Gateway, to filter out spam, malware, phishing attempts, and all of the other junk that often floods inboxes of users whose email server or hosted service isn’t as effective.

“If I have a good spam filter, do I REALLY need to know how to recognize phishing scams?”

If an email security company or hosted provider tells you their spam filter will catch 100% of spam, they’re not being completely honest. Most companies say their products catch 99% or 99.5% in their SLA (Service Level Agreement), with a false-positive rate of %.0001 or less. That’s reasonable and to be expected, especially considering the statistics.

According to public data, spam made up over 71% of global email traffic in April, 2014. As of September, 2018, spam volume had decreased to 54%, but considering that over 281 billion email messages are sent per day worldwide, that’s still over 151 billion spam messages sent every day, and while spam may be decreasing in total volume, it’s becoming more dangerous, with cryptojacking overtaking ransomware as the attack vector of choice for cybercriminals, and malware-as-a service turning cybercrime into a commodity for the masses,

So no matter how good an email security product is, there is always that chance that new and emerging (and sometimes tried-and true) social engineering techniques will succeed in tricking the next unsuspecting victim to part ways with his or her company’s bank account details.

And that brings me to the point of today’s post. It bears repeating that companies of all sizes and industries should consider ongoing training with their employees on how to recognize phishing attempts.

In today’s example, the scammer is using a classic BEC (Business Email Compromise) attack to try to get the recipient to open a malicious ISO file.

Phishing email using common Business Email Compromise tactics
Phishing email using common Business Email Compromise tactics

Because the threat of phishing and Business Email Compromise will continue well into the future, I will revisit this topic regularly throughout the year.

Meanwhile,  I would recommend sharing with all employees and business executives these 10 best practices for avoiding common email scams.

Business Email Compromise Protection Tips

 

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10 Ways to Reduce Spam in Your Inbox

SpamBefore the invention of email, mail that arrived in your physical mailbox often contained pamphlets, sales brochures, credit card offers, and product catalogs. Much of this waste was thrown away and ended up in a landfill somewhere. Today, the equivalent and often more annoying nuisance is spam. Spam comes in many forms, and has evolved from dubious product claims, miracle supplements, conspiracy theories, and offers of easy money to more malicious threats such as ransomware attacks and targeted spear-phishing.

While the amount of spam as a percentage of total email traffic has gone down recently, the severity of email-borne  threats has increased.

So how can users protect themselves from becoming the next victim to these malicious threats? There are numerous spam fighting tools in MDaemon and other mail servers, but server-side tools are only half of the spam-fighting equation. The other half is user education. With this in mind, here are 10 things users can do to reduce the amount of spam they receive.

  1. Unsubscribe – How often have you been asked by a store clerk for your email address or placed an order online? In either of these situations, chances are you may have ended up on a company’s mailing list. When you receive email from these companies, take the time to open the message and click on the Unsubscribe link. But first, make sure the email is in fact coming from a reputable company (Here’s how). If you’re not completely sure where the email came from, then report the message as spam instead of unsubscribing.
  2. Create a secondary email account – While we’re on the topic of retailers having your email address, you might also consider having a second email address that’s used solely for the purpose of store records or placing orders. This allows you to keep solicitations from these vendors out of your primary inbox.
  3. Keep your email address private – If your email address is visible on social networking sites like Facebook or Twitter, then it’s also visible to spammers. Spammers have tools that can easily detect visible email addresses and add them to their mailing lists. This is why it’s often recommended that, if you MUST use your email address on one of these sites, you mask it by changing its format. For example, type out “at” instead of using the “@” symbol. With the prevalence of Business Email Compromise (BEC) attacks, it’s even more important for executives to be mindful of posting their email address or other personal information, as scammers will use this information to send out well-crafted spear-phishing emails.
  4. Before you join a mailing list, make sure the list owner cannot sell your email address – If the list you’re joining has a privacy policy, read it thoroughly and make sure your information cannot be sold to a third party.
  5. Don’t reply to ANY spam or unsolicited marketing messages – Most spam messages use forged sender (return-path) addresses, so replying to a spam message will almost never result in the spammer getting your message. Replying to legitimate marketing messages tells the sender that your email address is valid, and thus, they may continue to send you spam.
  6. Never click on links – Often, when you click on a link in a spam email, it specifically identifies you to the spammer as having received the message. Not only can clicking links in spam messages identify you to the spammer; you can also end up getting infected with malware.
  7. Block Images – Even if you don’t click any links, an image opening in your email can alert spammers to a valid address. Spammers often try to be stealthy by inserting images that are only one pixel wide. If your mail client is configured to automatically open images, spammers can be alerted that your email address is valid. We recommend configuring your email client to automatically block images to reduce spam. You can always choose to view images in specific emails if you are sure the sender and content are legitimate.
  8. Make your email address unique – Spammers often use common names to try to guess email addresses. If your email address is unique, it makes it harder for spammers to guess your email address.
  9. Don’t fall for scams – If you receive an anonymous email from someone who appears to be in dire need, who promises you large sums of money for your small up-front investment, you may be witnessing the familiar Nigerian email scam, or one of many other variants. What are the odds that someone you’ve never met, who’s in a desperate situation, would contact you for help? Don’t fall for this scam.
  10. Never forward email from someone you don’t know – I often see email messages with some type of public service announcement, petition, or other bit of advice, and often, there’s a request to forward the message to your friends. Don’t fall for this, as it’s a prime opportunity for spammers to harvest email addresses.

Blocking junk email is not just the job of the mail server administrator. A well-informed email user can mean the difference between spam that is manageable and spam that is out of control. These ten tips will help you reduce spam, and help prevent you from becoming a victim to phishing or malware.

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The Recent Concerns with OpenPGP and S/MIME Encryption

On Monday, May 14th, the Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF) reported that European researchers had discovered core problems and commonplace implementation flaws in the S/MIME and OpenPGP protocol specifications. The vulnerability, which the researchers have described as EFAIL, can reportedly expose the content of encrypted emails (even messages sent in the past) to be viewed. The EFAIL vulnerability affects many email clients that use S/MIME and OpenPGP. There is a list of email clients with vulnerabilities by protocol in an article posted at thehackernews.com.

It’s very important to understand that to be at risk for this vulnerability, attackers would need access to your emails. This means that your email system has been compromised by an attacker who has access to the encrypted emails through tactics such as eavesdropping on network traffic (also known as a man-in-the-middle (MITM) attack), compromised email accounts, access to email servers, backup systems or client computers, usually achieved through social engineering attacks, such as Phishing and other tactics.

We have checked our own web-based email client (MDaemon Webmail) and our MDaemon OpenPGP-based encryption feature. Our results show that MDaemon Webmail is not vulnerable. However, the MDaemon email server OpenPGP feature is partially vulnerable to one implementation flaw. We have released a patch for affected versions of MDaemon email software, which can be found here. The current version of the MDaemon email server, v18.0.1, includes this fix.

A Reminder on the Best Email Security Practices

This latest issue should remind us all about the importance of email security practices as a whole.  Implementing strong passwords, two-factor authentication, location screening, SSL/TLS, SMTP AUTH, IP Shielding, dynamic screening, freezing accounts after failed authentication attempts, all play a role in helping to keep your accounts and your email safe. You can review a list of email security features in MDaemon here.

If you’ve implemented security to help protect malicious people from accessing your email accounts, then you are less likely to have an account compromised and you will be better protected against these types of attacks and vulnerabilities.

Ongoing Monitoring

While the researchers go into some depth to expose issues deep within the S/MIME and OpenPGP specification documents, these encryption protocols may need specification changes to address the longer-term issues mentioned in the initial report. MDaemon Technologies will continue to monitor this issue.

Additional Resources

We have provided links to past blog posts that cover a number of email security topics to provide additional information:

Thwart Hackers with Strong Password Policies

Are You Taking the Security of Your Email Account Seriously?

Why Passwords May Not Keep Your Email Safe

Block Incoming Connections by Country with MDaemon’s New Location Screening Feature

SSL & TLS Best Practices

Block Hackers from Guessing Passwords with MDaemon’s Improved Dynamic Screening

Are You Doing Enough to Protect Your Email Privacy?

Follow These 13 Tips to Avoid Being Blacklisted

New Security & Collaboration Features for MDaemon 17.5!

Introducing SecurityGateway 5.0, with New Location Screening, Terms of Service Agreements, and More!

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How to Encrypt your Email Messages from MDaemon Webmail in Three Easy Steps!

Whether you work in healthcare, finance, education, or another highly regulated industry, it’s likely that you’re required to meet increasingly stringent regulations on email security and privacy, such as the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR). But even if these strict requirements do not apply to your industry, you still want to maintain customer trust by ensuring their confidential data is safe.

To address these concerns, MDaemon offers email encryption using OpenPGP.

In the past, implementations of OpenPGP have been cumbersome, requiring users to manually exchange encryption keys or to take complex steps to send encrypted messages. With MDaemon, in addition to providing various ways to automate the encryption key exchange and server-side encryption processes, MDaemon Webmail users can easily enable per-message encryption right from within the message compose window.

Here’s a quick video to demonstrate how easy it is to encrypt messages in MDaemon Webmail.

A more comprehensive overview of MDaemon’s OpenPGP settings and how to configure them can be found in this knowledge base article.

Upgrade MDaemon to Take Advantage of the Latest Features!

Are you running an older version of MDaemon? Check out our Features by Version chart to see what you may be missing out on! Server-side email encryption with OpenPGP was introduced in MDaemon 15.5. Click here for upgrade & renewal instructions.

If you’re not currently using MDaemon and would like to see how an affordable, easy-to-use mail server can benefit your business, click here to download your free trial!

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A New Year and a New Name

As we welcome in a New Year, we are also welcoming a new company name. Alt-N Technologies is transitioning to MDaemon Technologies. This change is now in motion and will be implemented gradually across our many company assets.

We are adopting the new name to better leverage the brand equity and recognition we have built over the many years with our trusted email server. The new name will consolidate our brand and align the company around a globally recognized name.

With the name change also brings the new tag line: Simple Secure Email. We believe this tag line summarizes the value many of our global customers and partners have expressed over the years and is synonymous with the attributes that have made MDaemon a popular email server with many IT professionals and resellers.

We may have a new name but our mission and focus remain the same: develop features in our email server and email gateway products that deliver value (reliability, security, and flexibility) to the IT professionals that put their trust in us.

For more than 20 years we have succeeded by listening to our global customers and delivering exceptional service. We treat our employees, customers and channel partners like family and we believe this is just one of the many reasons why we remain a trusted vendor in an ever changing and competitive email and email security market. We may not be the biggest company you will deal with, but we strive to be the best company you deal with!

To our current customers we thank you for allowing us the opportunity to earn your business. To prospective customers, we ask that you give us a try. Download a free 30 day trial of our products or look at our hosted services and partners.

We look forward to an exciting 2018 and the opportunity to serve you!

Happy New Year,
Kevin

Kevin Beatty
VP, Marketing & Business Development

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SecurityGateway saves administrators time by letting users manage their own quarantines!

Email spam quarantine

You’ve probably heard that the vast majority of  all email traffic is spam, but did you know the volume of spam as a percentage of all email traffic has gone down over the years? In April of 2014, spam made up almost 70% of all email traffic. The most recent records show spam at about 59% of all email traffic. While these numbers are down slightly, they are still quite significant, and thus email providers need to be armed with a variety of tools to combat spam.

For email administrators, one of the challenges of fighting spam is balancing tasks performed by the administrator with tasks that users can perform to take some of the workload from administrators. With SecurityGateway’s quarantine management features, users can be granted permissions to manage their own quarantines.

SecurityGateway can be configured to handle spam in various ways. Messages can be refused, quarantined, or accepted, and their spam scores can be adjusted accordingly. When messages are quarantined and held on the server, the administrator can determine whether, and how often, to send the user an emailed quarantine summary report. The administrator can also grant users permissions to view and manage their own quarantine folders in the SecurityGateway interface. The quarantine summary email allows users to release the message from quarantine, and whitelist or blacklist the sender. When the quarantine is viewed in the SecurityGateway interface, users have additional options, such as the ability to feed messages to SecurityGateway’s Bayesian spam learning engine. Giving users the ability to manage their own quarantines allows administrators to focus on other tasks.

We generally recommend using the Bayesian feature to mark a message as spam, rather than blacklisting the sender. Thus, to avoid any confusion, we’ve put together the following best practices guide on quarantine management in SecurityGateway.

Click here to view the new SecurityGateway Quarantine Management guide.

Following the suggestions outlined in this guide will help ensure that you receive the messages you want, and block the messages you don’t want.

If you have questions, let us know in the comments section below!

 

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