Can you Have an Auto-Responder on a Frozen MDaemon Account?

I’ve heard various opinions on what to do with an MDaemon account belonging to someone who has left a company. In a recent post on our community forums, an MDaemon administrator had set a former employee’s account to Frozen, and then configured an auto-responder for the account. Frozen accounts cannot send outbound email, and the user of a frozen account cannot check for new email.

From this page of the MDaemon manual:

Account is FROZEN (can receive but cannot send or check email)

Select this option if you wish to allow the account to receive incoming messages but prevent it from being able to check or send messages. This is useful when, for example, you suspect the account has been hijacked. Freezing the account would prevent the malicious user from accessing its messages or using the account to send messages, but it would still be able to receive its incoming email.

The result of this is that auto-response messages from frozen accounts to external (non-local) addresses are sent to the Holding queue (more information on the Holding queue can be found here).

Let’s take a closer look at what happens.

Let’s say an employee has left the company. As the MDaemon administrator, I don’t want that employee’s account to be used, so I place it in Frozen status via the main Account Details screen of the account editor, as shown here.

MDaemon Account Editor Showinng Frozen Account
MDaemon Account Editor Showinng Frozen Account

Now let’s say I’ve enabled an auto-responder for the account, as shown here.

MDaemon Account Auto-Responder Enabled
MDaemon Account Auto-Responder Enabled

In the following example, I’ve created the account frozen@brad.ssllock.com, and have configured the auto-responder.

When I send a test to frozen@brad.ssllock.com from training@mdaemon.com, the MDaemon server hosting the @brad.ssllock.com domain places the message in the frozen account’s mailbox, but the user is unable to log into webmail or access the inbox via another email client.  When MDaemon then tries to send the auto-responder that we enabled for the frozen account, the message is moved to the  Holding queue and the following is written to the MDaemon logs:

Mon 2018-06-18 11:18:33.406: Session 042192; child 0001
Mon 2018-06-18 11:18:33.406: Parsing message <c:\mdaemon\queues\remote\pd50000000056.msg>
Mon 2018-06-18 11:18:33.406: *  From: frozen@brad.ssllock.com
Mon 2018-06-18 11:18:33.406: *  To: Training@mdaemon.com
Mon 2018-06-18 11:18:33.406: *  Subject: RE: Test to Frozen Account with Auto-Responder
Mon 2018-06-18 11:18:33.406: *  Size (bytes): 3822
Mon 2018-06-18 11:18:33.406: *  Message-ID: MDAEMON0005201806181118.AA1812640@mail.brad.ssllock.com
Mon 2018-06-18 11:18:33.421: Message moved to holding queue because sending account is disabled
Mon 2018-06-18 11:18:33.421: SMTP session terminated (Bytes in/out: 0/0)
Mon 2018-06-18 11:18:33.421: ———-

The result is that the auto-response never gets sent because the account is frozen.

The Solution

Rather than freezing the account, you could simply change the account’s password so that it can still accept mail and send auto-response messages. This can be done via the main Account Details screen, as shown here.

Account Details
Account Details

If you prefer to freeze the account instead of changing its password, another option would be to create a content filter rule that would send your desired response to the original message sender instead of using the auto-responder. That content filter rule would look something like this:

Content Filter Rule
Content Filter Rule

In this example, I created a rule that sends a reply to the sender of messages addressed to frozen.account@example.com using the “Send a NOTE 1” action. I then entered the $SENDER$ macro and the desired response. This message will be sent back to the message sender in response to a message originally sent to the frozen account.

You can get pretty creative with MDaemon’s content filter to perform a variety of tasks, so hopefully you found this helpful!

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5 Right-Click Tricks That Will Make You an MDaemon Webmail Jedi

Most of us don’t wake up thinking about email, but without it, business communications would be set back at least 20 years. We rely on email for many basic business functions, so we want email management features that simplify communications & make collaboration easier and more efficient.

With MDaemon Webmail, users can perform a variety of tasks via the Options menu. But, following the theme of making things easier, did you know you can perform many of these same tasks with the click of the right mouse button without leaving your Inbox?

In our latest tutorial video, we show you how to:

  • Create and Share Folders
  • Convert an Email to a Task
  • Import and Export Calendar Events
  • Rearrange Columns
  • Add Categories and Attachments to Notes

Want to learn more about the many ways MDaemon Webmail helps users stay connected? Visit our Webmail Features page, or download your free trial of MDaemon!

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Encrypting vs. Signing with OpenPGP. What’s the Difference?

Many businesses are responsible for maintaining large amounts of confidential data, including customer records, medical records, financial reports, legal documents, and much more. It’s very common for these types of information to be transmitted via email. So how can you ensure confidential data transmitted via email is kept private? How can you ensure the integrity of transmitted data and that a message actually came from its purported sender?

Businesses need to ensure confidentiality, data integrity, message authentication (proof of origin), and non-repudiation (proof of content and its origin). These goals can be accomplished using MDaemon’s OpenPGP message encryption and signing services. Read on to learn more about the differences between encrypting and signing, and when each is used.

The Need for Encryption

Businesses need to protect sensitive data and preserve confidentiality and privacy. Whether you work in healthcare, finance, legal, HR or education, chances are you’re familiar with the terms GDPR, HIPAA or FERPA (among others). Businesses that fail to meet these regulations risk data breaches that can lead to lost revenue or legal action, as well as steep fines. To address these issues, businesses can use encryption to make their sensitive data unreadable to unauthorized parties.

The Need for Signing

In addition to data privacy, businesses may need to ensure that a message was not altered during transit, and that it actually came from the purported sender. These tasks are accomplished with message signing (adding a digital signature) using OpenPGP. Much like your handwritten signature, a digital signature can be used for authentication purposes, but also cannot be forged.

Signing a message helps ensure the following:

  • Data Integrity – That the message was not altered from its original form.
  • Message Authentication (Proof of Origin) – That the message actually came from the purported sender.
  • Non-repudiation – That the sender cannot deny the authenticity of the message they sent and signed with OpenPGP.

Encrypting vs. Signing – What’s the Difference?

So what are the differences between encrypting & signing? Let’s discuss each.

What is Encryption?

Encryption is the act of converting plain text to cipher text. Cipher text is basically text that has been scrambled into non-readable format using an algorithm – called a cipher. MDaemon’s implementation of OpenPGP encryption uses public key encryption (also known as asymmetric key encryption) to encrypt email messages and attachments.

So How Does Public Key Encryption Work?

Public key encryption uses public/private key pairs. If you want me to send you an encrypted message, you send me your public key, which I import into my encryption software (using the OpenPGP configuration screen in MDaemon, in this case). I encrypt the message with your public key. When you receive the message, you decrypt it with your private key. Even though your public key can be freely distributed and used to encrypt messages addressed to you, these encrypted messages can only be decrypted with your own private key. This private key must always be kept secret. Data encrypted with the public key can only be decrypted with its corresponding private key; conversely, data encrypted with the private key can only be decrypted with its corresponding public key. We’ll talk about why you would encrypt a message with your own private key in the next section when we discuss message signing.

Encrypting email with OpenPGP
Encrypting email with OpenPGP

In our latest release of MDaemon, we’ve added the ability for MDaemon Webmail users to encrypt messages from within the message compose window. This procedure is explained in this blog post.

Check out the following video to see this process in action!

Encrypting a message helps ensure that the message is kept confidential. The message remains in its encrypted format until it is decrypted with the recipient’s private key.

What is Message Signing with OpenPGP?

As I mentioned above, messages are encrypted with the message recipient’s public key and decrypted with the corresponding private key. Message signing, on the other hand, uses the sender’s private key to sign (encrypt) the message, and his public key is used to read the signature (decrypt). Message signing binds the identity of the message source to the message. This helps ensure data integrity, message authentication, and non-repudiation.

For example, if John wants to digitally sign a message to Michelle, he uses his private key to encrypt the message, and sends it (along with his public key if it hasn’t already been sent) to Michelle. Since John’s public key is the only key that can decrypt the message, the digital signature is verified by simply decrypting the message with John’s public key.

Signing with OpenPGP
Signing an Email Message with OpenPGP

Signing a message with OpenPGP ensures that the message was not altered in transit, that it did in fact come from the purported sender, and that the sender cannot deny the authenticity of the message they sent and signed with OpenPGP.

More information on using MDaemon’s PGP encryption & signing features can be found in the following knowledge base article:

How to enable MDaemon PGP, configure who can use MDPGP, and create keys for specific users

http://www.altn.com/Support/KnowledgeBase/KnowledgeBaseResults/?Number=1087

Do you have questions? Let us know in the Comments section below!

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How to Encrypt your Email Messages from MDaemon Webmail in Three Easy Steps!

Whether you work in healthcare, finance, education, or another highly regulated industry, it’s likely that you’re required to meet increasingly stringent regulations on email security and privacy, such as the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR). But even if these strict requirements do not apply to your industry, you still want to maintain customer trust by ensuring their confidential data is safe.

To address these concerns, MDaemon offers email encryption using OpenPGP.

In the past, implementations of OpenPGP have been cumbersome, requiring users to manually exchange encryption keys or to take complex steps to send encrypted messages. With MDaemon, in addition to providing various ways to automate the encryption key exchange and server-side encryption processes, MDaemon Webmail users can easily enable per-message encryption right from within the message compose window.

Here’s a quick video to demonstrate how easy it is to encrypt messages in MDaemon Webmail.

A more comprehensive overview of MDaemon’s OpenPGP settings and how to configure them can be found in this knowledge base article.

Upgrade MDaemon to Take Advantage of the Latest Features!

Are you running an older version of MDaemon? Check out our Features by Version chart to see what you may be missing out on! Server-side email encryption with OpenPGP was introduced in MDaemon 15.5. Click here for upgrade & renewal instructions.

If you’re not currently using MDaemon and would like to see how an affordable, easy-to-use mail server can benefit your business, click here to download your free trial!

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Never lose an important message. Organize your Inbox with message Categories!

MDaemon’s webmail client is loaded with a variety of features for organization, collaboration and security. As a daily user of MDaemon Webmail (I use it almost exclusively instead of my desktop email client), I like to keep important messages organized so I can find them later. This is made easy with message categories (in addition to follow-up flags). Within the MDaemon webmail client, you’ll find a variety of built-in categories, or you can create your own custom categories. Multiple categories can be assigned to a message, and messages can be arranged by category, keeping all of your important messages in one, easy-to-find place.

Check out our latest tutorial video to learn more, or if you’re not yet an MDaemon user, click here to download your free trial!

 

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Save Time by Saving Frequently-Performed Searches as Folders

If you’re like me, you like shortcuts that make life easier when performing common tasks. For example, if you work in finance or accounting, wouldn’t it be nice to be able to pull up all emails with the word “invoice” with a single mouse click? Well now you can. With the latest release of MDaemon, we introduced search folders in MDaemon Webmail. This week’s 30-Second Email Tips video will walk you through the setup process.

Search folders were added in MDaemon 17.5.1. If you’re running an older version of MDaemon, you could be missing out on some great new features!

If you’re not currently using MDaemon, but would like to try it out, click here to download your free 30-day trial!

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10 Tips to Identify a Phishing Email

Don’t Risk Losing your Life Savings to Scammers. Follow these 10 Tips to Identify a Phishing Email.

From October 2013 to December 2016, phishing scams cost businesses approximately $1.6 billion, averaging roughly $500 million each year. While these figures are staggering, they continue to rise as scammers reap huge payouts from BEC (Business Email Compromise), CEO fraud and other phishing scams.

The real estate industry is a prime target for phishing because large sums of money change hands and there are various weak links in the transaction process. If any step within the transaction process becomes compromised with a successful phishing email, the attacker could gain access to a legitimate email address from which to launch other attacks. The fraudster could then lie in wait, scanning email messages for financial or transaction related details, and then send off fraudulent wire transfer instructions to an unsuspecting buyer, seller, or agent. For example, this happened to a 31 year-old first-time homebuyer in San Antonio, Texas. You can read details about this case here, but the short version of the story is that she felt that she was in a time crunch to send in her down payment and finalize other closing tasks, and felt that the title company was dragging its feet. This state of high anxiety made her a prime target for a phishing email she received stating that she had previously been given the wrong wire transfer information, and that she needed to wire her down payment to a new account. With 5 hours left to get everything done, she attempted to contact her title company to confirm the change, but no one responded, so in a panic, she hastily ran to the bank and wire transferred her $52,000 down payment. Unfortunately, she sent her life savings to scammers.

The phishing industry is so lucrative for scammers because the barriers to entry are low relative to potential huge payouts. With botnets-for-hire and Malware as a Service (Maas), spammers have an impressive arsenal of tools at their disposal to propagate their campaigns, so to fight this scourge, an educated user is the best defense against phishing scams. With this in mind, here are my top 10 tips on how to identify and protect yourself from phishing attacks.

  1. Watch out for messages disguised as something expected, like a shipment or payment notification. These often contain links to malware sites. Hover your mouse over any links to make sure they’re safe. Think before you click! Here’s an example using a phishing email I received claiming to come from HSBC.

    Payment notification phishing email
    Watch for unexpected payment or shipment notices
  2. Watch for messages asking for personal information such as account numbers, Social Security numbers, and other personal information. Legitimate companies will never ask for this over email.
  3. Beware of urgent or threatening messages claiming that your account has been suspended and prompting you to click on a link to unlock your account.
  4. Check for poor grammar or spelling errors. While legitimate companies are very strict about emails they send out, Phishing emails often contain poor spelling or grammar.
  5. Hover before you click! Phishing emails often contain links to malware sites. Don’t trust the URL you see! Always hover your mouse over the link to view its real destination. If the link claims to point to a known, reputable site, it’s always safer to manually type the URL into your browser’s address bar.
  6. Check the Greeting – Is the message addressed to a generic recipient, such as “Valued customer” or “Sir/Madam?” If so, be careful & think twice! Legitimate businesses will often use your real first and last name. In our HSBC example, notice the generic greeting.

    Watch for generic greetings in email messages
    Watch for generic greetings in email messages
  7. Check the Signature – In addition to the greeting, phishing emails often leave out important information in the signature. Legitimate businesses will always have accurate contact details in their signature, so if a message’s signature looks incomplete or inaccurate, chances are it’s spam. In our HSBC example, the sender’s name and contact information are missing from the signature.

    Watch for generic signatures in phishing email messages.
    Watch for generic signatures in phishing email messages.
  8. Don’t download Attachments – With the proliferation of Ransomware as a Service (Raas), spammers have an easy mechanism for distributing malware-laden spam messages to thousands of users. And because the payout for ransomware can be quite high, even one successful ransomware infection could net the spammer large amounts of money. If there’s ANY doubt about the identity of the message sender or the contents of an attachment, play it safe and don’t download the attachment.
  9. Don’t trust the From address – Many phishing emails will have a forged sender address. The From address is displayed in two places. The Envelope From is used by mail servers to generate NDR messages, while the Header From is used by the email client to display information in the From field. Both of these headers can be spoofed. MDaemon Webmail has built-in security features to help users identify spoofed emails. Many mail clients hide the From address, only showing the From name, which can be easily spoofed. In MDaemon Webmail, the From address is always displayed, giving users a clearer view into the source of the email and helping them identify spoofed senders. Using our HSBC example, I’ve highlighted the actual sender.
    Phishing email highlighting the actual sending address
    Phishing email highlighting the actual sending address

    MDaemon Webmail will also display information in the Security tag to help users identify messages from verified senders, as shown here.

    MDaemon Webmail - DKIM-Verified Sender
    MDaemon Webmail – DKIM-Verified Sender
  10. Don’t Enable Macros – And while we’re on the subject of ransomware, another common vector for ransomware infections is through macros in Microsoft Word documents. These documents often arrive in phishing emails claiming to have important content from HR, Finance, or another important department, and to trick the user, they request the user to enable macros. Never trust an email that asks you to enable macros before downloading a Word document.

While anti-spam and anti-malware tools are quite effective at filtering out the majority of scams, there’s really no substitute for good old-fashioned user education. Know the potential costs to your business and don’t become the next victim!

If you’re the MDaemon or SecurityGateway administrator and need help with your security settings to help block as much phishing as possible before it reaches your users, give us a call or drop us an email support request.

 

 

 

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With MDaemon Webmail, you can use the same keyboard shortcuts found in your favorite email client!

If you’re what most would call a “power user,” then you may be used to using keyboard shortcuts. If you’re used to the keyboard shortcuts of another client, such as Outlook, Thunderbird or Eudora, MDaemon’s webmail client has a feature that allows you to continue using those shortcuts. So if you’re used to using Shift+P to print (which is an Outlook shortcut), then all you need to do in MDaemon’s web-based email client is go to the Options menu & select Personalize. Then select your preferred option in the Keyboard Shortcuts drop-down menu, as shown here:

MDaemon webmail keyboard shortcuts
MDaemon’s webmail client lets you continue using the same keyboard shortcuts found in your favorite email client!

More information on this feature can be found in the following page from our online manual:

http://help.altn.com/mdaemon/worldclient/en/index.html?shortcut_keys.htm

If you have questions or comments about this feature, let us know! If you’re not an MDaemon user, but would like to learn more about its features, visit the MDaemon product page and have a look around!

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SecurityGateway saves administrators time by letting users manage their own quarantines!

Email spam quarantine

You’ve probably heard that the vast majority of  all email traffic is spam, but did you know the volume of spam as a percentage of all email traffic has gone down over the years? In April of 2014, spam made up almost 70% of all email traffic. The most recent records show spam at about 59% of all email traffic. While these numbers are down slightly, they are still quite significant, and thus email providers need to be armed with a variety of tools to combat spam.

For email administrators, one of the challenges of fighting spam is balancing tasks performed by the administrator with tasks that users can perform to take some of the workload from administrators. With SecurityGateway’s quarantine management features, users can be granted permissions to manage their own quarantines.

SecurityGateway can be configured to handle spam in various ways. Messages can be refused, quarantined, or accepted, and their spam scores can be adjusted accordingly. When messages are quarantined and held on the server, the administrator can determine whether, and how often, to send the user an emailed quarantine summary report. The administrator can also grant users permissions to view and manage their own quarantine folders in the SecurityGateway interface. The quarantine summary email allows users to release the message from quarantine, and whitelist or blacklist the sender. When the quarantine is viewed in the SecurityGateway interface, users have additional options, such as the ability to feed messages to SecurityGateway’s Bayesian spam learning engine. Giving users the ability to manage their own quarantines allows administrators to focus on other tasks.

We generally recommend using the Bayesian feature to mark a message as spam, rather than blacklisting the sender. Thus, to avoid any confusion, we’ve put together the following best practices guide on quarantine management in SecurityGateway.

Click here to view the new SecurityGateway Quarantine Management guide.

Following the suggestions outlined in this guide will help ensure that you receive the messages you want, and block the messages you don’t want.

If you have questions, let us know in the comments section below!

 

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Why Passwords May Not Keep Your Email Safe

Two-factor Authentication using phone pin and passwordWe live in an era where the amount of valuable data businesses must store is increasing at an unprecedented pace. Consequently, the number of “bad guys” trying to gain access to that data is also increasing, and hackers have some pretty sophisticated tools at their disposal to try to force their way into your data. They use a variety of tactics, including social engineering, brute force attacks and dictionary attacks, among others.

The problem is made worse by the prevalence of weak passwords. Did you know that, even in 2017, one of the most common passwords is 12345678? In an experiment conducted in 2013, with the help of a list of hashed passwords obtained online, hackers were able to crack about 90% of a list of over 16,000 passwords.

Passwords are not just vulnerable to external threats. They must be protected from internal threats as well. Have you ever written down a password on a piece of paper, and then thrown it in the garbage? Have you ever discarded an old hard drive without destroying it? If this information gets in the wrong hands, it can lead to severe financial loss for a company, and damage to its reputation.

Passwords and usernames belong to one of three types of identification data:

  1. Something you know
  2. Something you own
  3. Something you are or do (such as a fingerprint or other biometric element)

Passwords and usernames fall within the category of “something you know.” The three items listed above are considered factors of authentication, so when only one type of data is used to log into a system (such as a username and password), you are using a single factor of authentication.

Passwords alone are often not enough to protect your data against increasingly sophisticated attacks. Requiring a second factor of authentication can drastically reduce data theft.

Two-factor authentication is not a new concept. In fact, most of us already use it in other ways besides accessing our email. Here are some examples of two-factor authentication that many of us already use daily:

  • An ATM card (something you own) and a PIN (something you know)
  • A credit card (something you own) and a zip code (something you know)
  • A phone (something you own) and a fingerprint (something you are)

MDaemon includes two-factor authentication for WorldClient, MDaemon’s webmail client. With two-factor authentication, users must provide two forms of authentication – a password and a unique verification code that is obtained via any client that supports Google Authenticator (available in the Google Play store).

Two-factor authentication has many benefits:

  • It provides an extra layer of defense when a password isn’t strong enough.
  • It reduces online identity theft, phishing, and other techniques because a victim’s password isn’t enough to gain access to his or her data.
  • It helps companies in finance, health care, and other industries comply with PCI, HIPAA and other regulations.
  • It makes working remotely safer.

In this video, we demonstrate how to enable and use two-factor authentication in MDaemon and WorldClient.

If you’re concerned about privacy and security, two-factor authentication provides extra protection for your data. Download the latest version of MDaemon to take advantage of this extra security!

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