10 Ways to Reduce Spam in Your Inbox

SpamBefore the invention of email, mail that arrived in your physical mailbox often contained pamphlets, sales brochures, credit card offers, and product catalogs. Much of this waste was thrown away and ended up in a landfill somewhere. Today, the equivalent and often more annoying nuisance is spam. Spam comes in many forms. Some examples include dubious product claims, miracle supplements, conspiracy theories, and offers of easy money.

Spam statistics are staggering. More than 100 billion spam messages are sent every day, representing around 85 percent of global email traffic.

So what can be done about this spam epidemic? There are numerous spam fighting tools in MDaemon and other mail servers, but server-side tools are only half of the spam-fighting equation. The other half is user education. With this in mind, here are 10 things users can do to reduce the amount of spam they receive.

  1. Unsubscribe – How often have you been asked by a store clerk for your email address or placed an order online? In either of these situations, chances are you may have ended up on a company’s mailing list. When you receive email from these companies, take the time to open the message and click on the Unsubscribe link. But first, make sure the email is in fact coming from a reputable company. If you’re not completely sure where the email came from, then report the message as spam instead of unsubscribing.
  2. Create a secondary email account – While we’re on the topic of retailers having your email address, you might also consider having a second email address that’s used solely for the purpose of store records or placing orders. This allows you to keep solicitations from these vendors out of your primary inbox.
  3. Keep your email address private – If your email address is visible on social networking sites like Facebook or Twitter, then it’s also visible to spammers. Spammers have tools that can easily detect visible email addresses and add them to their mailing lists. This is why it’s often recommended that, if you MUST use your email address on one of these sites, you mask it by changing its format. For example, type out “at” instead of using the “@” symbol.
  4. Before you join a list, make sure the list owner cannot sell your email address – If the list you’re joining has a privacy policy, read it thoroughly and make sure your information cannot be sold to a third party.
  5. Don’t reply to ANY spam or unsolicited marketing messages – Most spam messages use forged sender (return-path) addresses, so replying to a spam message will almost never result in the spammer getting your message. Replying to legitimate marketing messages tells the sender that your email address is valid, and thus, they may continue to send you spam.
  6. Never click on links – Often, when you click on a link in a spam email, it specifically identifies you to the spammer as having received the message. Not only can clicking links in spam messages identify you to the spammer; you can also end up getting infected with malware.
  7. Block Images – Even if you don’t click any links, an image opening in your email can alert spammers to a valid address. Spammers often try to be stealthy by inserting images that are only one pixel wide. If your mail client is configured to automatically open images, spammers can be alerted that your email address is valid. We recommend configuring your email client to automatically block images to reduce spam. You can always choose to view images in specific emails if you are sure the sender and content are legitimate.
  8. Make your email address unique – Spammers often use common names to try to guess email addresses. If your email address is unique, it makes it harder for spammers to guess your email address.
  9. Don’t fall for scams – If you receive an anonymous email from someone who appears to be in dire need, who promises you large sums of money for your small up-front investment, you may be witnessing the familiar Nigerian email scam, or one of many other variants. What are the odds that someone you’ve never met, who’s in a desperate situation, would contact you for help? Don’t fall for this scam.
  10. Never forward email from someone you don’t know – I often see email messages with some type of public service announcement, petition, or other bit of advice, and often, there’s a request to forward the message to your friends. Don’t fall for this, as it’s a prime opportunity for spammers to harvest email addresses.

Blocking junk email is not just the job of the mail server administrator. A well-informed email user can mean the difference between spam that is manageable and spam that is out of control. These ten tips will help you reduce spam, and help prevent you from becoming a victim to phishing or malware.

Encryption Options for Keeping Your Private Email Messages Safe

Email encryption options with MDaemonIs your company prepared for the next big data breach? According to a study by Ponemon Institute, which surveyed 567 executives in the United States on how prepared they think their companies are to respond to a data breach, the following findings were made:

  1. Most respondents believe their companies are not prepared to deal with the consequences of a data breach.
  2. Most companies have data breach response plans, but they are ineffective.
  3. Data breach response plans are often not effective because they are not reviewed in a timely manner.
  4. Data breach detection technologies are rarely deployed.

Also, consider these startling enterprise email security statistics from Virtru’s blog:

  1. 87% of senior managers upload business files to a personal email or cloud account.
  2. Email malware creation is up 26% year over year, with 317 million new pieces of malware created in 2014.
  3. Hackers targeted 5 out of 6 large companies using email attacks last year — an annual increase of 40%.
  4. Cybercrime has a 1,425% ROI.

With the proliferation of data theft and compromised systems, more companies are addressing data privacy concerns via a renewed focus on security and encryption technology.

To address these data privacy and security concerns, MDaemon administrators and users have three options for keeping confidential email messages and attachments secure – SSL/TLS, Virtru, and OpenPGP. When an email message is sent, SSL or TLS is used to encrypt the connection from the mail client to the server or from the sending mail server to receiving mail server. Virtru provides end-to-end message and attachment encryption, and OpenPGP provides server-side encryption and key management as well as client-side encryption (when used with an OpenPGP plug-in on the mail client).

Encrypting the Connection with SSL or TLS

When you use POP or IMAP to retrieve your email messages, your username and password are transmitted in clear-text across the internet. This means that anyone using the same network or wireless connection as you, or anyone who has access to internet traffic at your ISP, can potentially intercept your data and read your login credentials. A hacker with malicious intent can then read your email, steal confidential information, or send out thousands of spam messages from your account. Your email credentials are valuable to spammers because the success rate of their solicitations is much greater than if they had simply forged the return-path of the message (which is characteristic of most spam messages).

One method for preventing hackers from being able to “sniff out” private data that’s in transit over the network is to use SSL or TLS. SSL and TLS are methods for encrypting the connection between two mail servers (SMTP) or between the mail server & mail client (POP & IMAP). In other words, the communication channel is encrypted – not the email message itself. A good explanation of SSL can be found here: https://www.digicert.com/ssl.htm

Normally, SMTP traffic is sent from client-to-server or server-to-server over port 25, but if you’d like the SMTP connection to be encrypted using SSL, by default you can configure your mail client to send outbound SMTP traffic over port 465, and you can also configure MDaemon or SecurityGateway to use port 465. Likewise, the default POP3 SSL port is 995, and the default IMAP SSL port is 993.

This knowledge base article contains instructions for configuring SSL features for SMTP, POP, and IMAP for MDaemon.
http://www.altn.com/Support/KnowledgeBase/KnowledgeBaseResults/?Number=841

This knowledge base article explains how to configure SSL features for SMTP & HTTP in SecurityGateway:
http://www.altn.com/Support/KnowledgeBase/KnowledgeBaseResults/?Number=481

When SSL or TLS is used, the data itself is not encrypted, but the connection is. If you’d like the data itself to be encrypted, then continue reading for how to encrypt email messages and attachments using Virtru and OpenPGP.

Client-Side Message & Attachment Encryption with Virtru

While SSL & TLS encrypt the connection, Virtru (included with MDaemon) encrypts the actual email message. Virtru provides end-to-end encryption – meaning the message is encrypted on the sending client and decrypted on the receiving client. Messages encrypted via Virtru are stored in their encrypted state on the server and cannot be decrypted without the proper keys. Virtru is included with MDaemon.

Click here for more information on Virtru.

Server-Side Message & Attachment Encryption with OpenPGP

With OpenPGP, messages are encrypted on the server, but they can also be encrypted on the mail client if an OpenPGP plug-in has been installed. The MDaemon administrator enables the OpenPGP features, creates public & private keys for users, and selects users who are allowed to use OpenPGP. Use the MDPGP configuration screen (located under the Security menu) to configure automatic encryption & key exchange, encryption key size and expiration, and to import keys. You can also create content filter rules to encrypt messages that meet specific criteria using OpenPGP.

This knowledge base article contains step-by-step instructions for enabling MDaemon’s OpenPGP features, configuring who can use it, and creating public & private keys for users.

Are These Features Easy to Use?

SSL and TLS are enabled by simply enabling the SSL ports on the mail server and configuring your mail client to use the SSL ports.

With Virtru, you’re up and running by simply enabling the feature in WorldClient. When you enable Virtru in WorldClient, your request is first sent to Virtru for processing. Within seconds, you’ll receive a pop-up message indicating that Virtru is now ready to start encrypting and decrypting your messages and message attachments. It’s that simple!

And for OpenPGP, options are available to help automate the encryption, decryption, and key import/exchange processes.

Conclusion

To recap, SSL & TLS can be used to help prevent eavesdropping on your email communication channel by encrypting the connection, while Virtru & OpenPGP can be used to help keep your email messages safe from unauthorized access by encrypting the actual email messages and attachments. Together, these security measures help to ensure that your confidential business data remains safe from unauthorized access.

Are you ready to ensure your important business communications are safe from prying eyes? Then download MDaemon and get started with SSL, Virtru, and OpenPGP!