New MDaemon Collaboration Feature: Send & Receive DropBox Files with WorldClient

In MDaemon 17, we added support for DropBox integration for WorldClient, MDaemon’s web-based email client. Now, users can easily save attachments in inbound messages to their DropBox account, or insert links to their DropBox files in outbound attachments. Because files are stored in DropBox and not on the mail server, disk space and bandwidth are reduced.

We’ve put together the following tutorial video to help you get started with WorldClient’s DropBox file sharing features.

Step-by-step instructions can be found in the following knowledge base article:

http://www.altn.com/Support/KnowledgeBase/KnowledgeBaseResults/?Number=1166

If you’re not yet an MDaemon user, visit the MDaemon product page to see what you may be missing!

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SecurityGateway 4.5.1 – With Integrated Encryption, Tracking & E-Sign with RMail!

I’m happy to announce the release of SecurityGateway 4.5.1. Though this is only considered a point (.1) release, it packs a big punch with the newly-added RMail features from RPost. With RMail, you can:

  • Track your important emails and know precisely when they’re delivered and opened.
  • Receive Proof of Delivery, Time, and Exact Content.
  • Easily encrypt sensitive emails and attachments for security or legal compliance.
  • RMail™ makes it easy for all parties to e-sign and complete a transaction, as well as to determine when a message has been delivered and opened.
Encrypt, E-sign, SecurityGateway
RMail Encryption, Signing, Proof of Delivery

For more information on the latest features and enhancements, or to download the latest SecurityGateway with RMail support, visit our downloads page.

As always, you can leave a comment if you have questions!

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Open Protocol (XMPP/Jabber) Support Provides More Instant Messaging Choices for MDaemon Users

In today’s connected society, users demand instant access to open channels of Chat-bubblescommunication. For years, MDaemon has offered instant messaging via WorldClient Instant Messenger. Formerly known as ComAgent, WorldClient Instant Messenger has evolved to support open protocol (XMPP/Jabber) for instant messaging, giving users more choices over what instant messaging client to use.

What exactly is XMPP & why should I care?

XMPP is a communication protocol based on XML that powers a wide range of applications. It is based on open standards and offers greater flexibility and choice for its users. XMPP supports secure communications via SSL, and a wide variety of XMPP clients for Windows, MacOS, Linux, iOS, Android, BlackBerry, and Nokia devices. There’s even a DOS/Command-line client for die-hard DOS purists. A complete list of XMPP clients can be found at xmpp.org.

Why is this important for MDaemon users and administrators?

In addition to greater choice for end users, other features that we’ve come to appreciate from the ComAgent years remain, including file transfer for end users and message logging for administrators.

How do I connect to MDaemon’s XMPP service with third-party chat clients?

The steps for each instant messaging client will vary, but the concepts for each are the same. You’ll need your email address, password, and the host name or IP address of your MDaemon server. I’ve created a tutorial video showing the configuration process for both MDaemon administrators and end users.

Want to learn more? We have some valuable resources in the following knowledge base article.

http://www.altn.com/Support/KnowledgeBase/KnowledgeBaseResults/?Number=1167

This is just one of many collaboration features found in the MDaemon Messaging Server. Download your free trial & start collaborating today!

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New Feature: Email Health Check for Optimal Security Settings

Our latest version of MDaemon, MDaemon 17, comes packed with lots of new features for administrators and end users, including new password security, support for Let’sEncrypt, DropBox integration, message scheduling, and much more. Today, I’d like to demonstrate MDaemon’s new Health Check utility. With this handy new tool, administrators no longer have to go through each feature to verify that it’s configured for optimal security. This new tool will analyze all security-related settings, display each setting’s current value, its recommended value, and where that feature is located in the MDaemon interface. This tool offers administrators the flexibility to change all settings to their recommended value at the same time, or to select and change individual settings. In this tutorial video, I demonstrate how to use the new Health Check utility.

Need additional help? More guidance on the MDaemon Health Check utility can be found in this knowledge base article.

If you haven’t yet upgraded to MDaemon 17, check out the release notes and our previous blog post to see what you’re missing!

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MDaemon 17 Adds New Security and Collaboration Features

Dropbox Integration for Webmail Users, Popular IM Client Connections, Support for Let’s Encrypt, new Message Scheduling, and More!

Businesses around the world have depended on the reliability and security of MDaemon for over 20 years.

With the release of MDaemon 17, we’ve included additional security features and introduced several new features for WorldClient, MDaemon’s feature-packed web-based email client.

Below, you’ll find a summary of key new features. A more comprehensive list of all new features and enhancements can be found in the MDaemon release notes on the MDaemon Download page.

New Security Features

MDaemon Health Check Utility

MDaemon’s new health check utility will analyze all security-related settings and display a report of each feature that is not configured with the recommended setting. This report includes the name of the feature, the current setting for that feature, its recommended setting, and the GUI path to the setting. Administrators can select an entry in the report and click on “Set to Recommended” to re-configure the selected feature with the recommended setting, or by holding down CTRL or SHIFT, multiple items can be selected and re-configured simultaneously.

MDaemon Health Check Utility
MDaemon Health Check Utility

Enhanced Password Security

An option has been added to store mailbox passwords using non-reversible encryption. This protects the passwords from being decrypted by MDaemon, the administrator, or a possible attacker.

Enhanced Password Security
Enhanced Password Security

More information on this feature can be found in the following knowledge base article:
How to store mailbox passwords using non-reversible encryption

Access to Free Certificates

MDaemon now supports “Let’s Encrypt,” a certificate authority service that uses an automated process to provide free certificates for Transport Layer Security (TLS) encryption for secure websites.

New Webmail Features

Dropbox Integration

WorldClient users can save message attachments directly to their Dropbox accounts and attach files directly from Dropbox when composing a message.

DropBox Integration
DropBox Integration

More information on Dropbox integration:
How to set up Dropbox integration

Flexible Chat Client Options

WorldClient Instant Messenger now uses the XMPP protocol for instant messaging instead of WorldClient’s proprietary protocol. This gives users more chat client options (those that support XMPP), especially when wanting to use mobile chat clients to connect with MDaemon users on their desktop.

Message Scheduling

WorldClient users now have the option of sending a message at a later date and time. This feature is located under the Advanced button in the message compose window. Simply select the desired date and time in the new drop-down menus, and then click on Send. For more information on how to enable this feature, please see the MDaemon release notes.

WorldClient Message Scheduling
WorldClient Message Scheduling

Support for Multiple Email Signatures

WorldClient now supports multiple email signatures. This is useful in situations where a user has additional aliases for his account, such as sales@example.com, etc. A default signature can be assigned to the user’s primary email address and to each alias. When composing a message, users can use the default signature assigned to the email address (or alias) currently used, or choose from among their other signatures via the Advanced button in the message Compose window.

Multiple Email Signatures
Multiple Email Signatures

Easily Share Contacts with Other Email Clients

When using the LookOut or WorldClient themes, WorldClient users can now import vCards (.vcf files) into their default contacts folder. vCards enable users to send and receive contact information in a format that can be easily read in other email programs. A vCard may contain a contact’s name, title, phone number, email address, mailing address, and other information.

Import Contacts VCF
Import Contacts VCF

Enhanced Desktop Notifications

Desktop notifications are now available for WorldClient tasks and events. When a reminder is configured for an event or task, a pop-up window will display to alert the user.

Desktop Notifications
Desktop Notifications

Other Improvements

  • ActiveSync Corrupt Message Notifications notify administrators if a particular message cannot be processed.
  • The ActiveSync Migration Client now supports the ability to select which folder types to migrate.
  • A new content filter option has been added which will quarantine the entire message when it contains a restricted attachment.
  • The Retry Queue configuration screen has a new checkbox which enables sending of a “successful delivery” DSN (delivery status notification message) any time a message is delivered which has previously been delayed and placed in the retry queue for whatever reason.
  • Options have been added to the Outlook Connector centralised management for local cache filename and attachments directory.

If your license is current, you can upgrade to MDaemon 17 for free. You can check for MDaemon updates via the Help menu in MDasemon, or click here to visit the MDaemon purchase page.

Visit our Downloads page to download the latest MDeamon, or click here to read the release notes.

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Easy Backup & Recovery with MDaemon

MDaemon’s user-friendly flat-file structure makes it easy to backup and recover your email messages, user accounts, security settings, and any other data stored in MDaemon. No extra Windows components or third-party applications are required, and you won’t have to navigate through any confusing dialog boxes to backup & recover your data. Backing up and restoring MDaemon is as easy as drag & drop. All you would need to do is map a drive letter from the MDaemon server to another drive on your network, then drag over the files you want to back up.

In this example, we’ve backed up our users’ email directories, our configuration files, and our mail queues.

MDaemon Backup FoldersIf you’ve accidentally deleted users, you can simply restore the Userlist.dat file, located in the MDaemon/App directory. In this example, let’s assume user01, user02 and user03 were all deleted.

MDaemon Users DeletedSimply drag the userlist.dat file from your backup back to the MDaemon/App directory, as shown here.

Userlist drag & dropAnd if email messages were deleted, they can easily be restored as well. Email messages are stored within the Users directory under the specific domain and user. Simply drag the .msg files from the backup to the User’s folder on the MDaemon server.

Restoring Email MessagesYou can do a lot more with MDaemon’s file structure, including restoring a user’s contacts when they were accidentally deleted, moving public folders, and much more.

Click here to learn more about MDaemon’s file structure.

If you’re new to MDaemon, visit our MDaemon product page to learn more!

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Restricting Message Size for Everyone Except a Select Few Users in MDaemon

Recently, one of our customers asked the following question:

“How do I restrict messages to 2MB for inbound and outbound mail – for all users except a small group of users?”

In MDaemon, this can be done via the Content Filter (located under the Security menu). Simply follow these easy steps:

  1. Add the users who will not be subject to the size restriction to a group via Accounts | Groups & Templates.
  2. Go to Security | Content Filter and create a new rule.
  3. In the left-hand “Conditions” column, check the box “If MESSAGE SIZE is greater than.”
  4. In the right-hand “Actions” column, check the box “DELETE the message”, and also check the box “Send a NOTE 1 to.”
  5. In the bottom section, click on the blue text “is greater than 10K” and enter a value in KB (2000 KB, for example), and then click OK.
  6. Click on the blue text “Specify Information” next to “and send note 1.”
  7.  In the new window, enter $SENDER$ in the To field, adjust the subject if desired, and enter a message in the main window, such as “Sorry, your message has exceeded the allowed size limit.”
  8. Click OK to save your progress.
  9. Give your new rule a name in the “Name this rule” field at the top, and click OK to save the rule.
  10. Now, we need to create a new rule to skip the size limit rule for members of the group we created in Step 1. Click on New Rule.
  11. Give your rule a name.
  12. In the left-hand “Conditions” column, check the boxes “If SENDER is a member of GROUP” and “If RECIPIENT is a member of GROUP.”
  13. In the box below, click on the blue “specific group name” text for each item, and select the group you created in Step 1. Do not change the word “or” to “and.”
  14. In the right-hand “Actions” column, check the box “SKIP the next ‘n’ rules.”
  15. Click the blue text “Specify Information” in the bottom section, and verify that it has “1” specified under “Skip over how many rules?”
  16. Click OK.
  17. Save your new rule.
  18. Back on the main Rules screen, highlight the last rule you created, and click the “Move up” button to move it above the size limit rule we created previously.
  19. Click OK to exit the content filter.
Here are screenshots of these rules:

Screen1

Screen2

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

As a reminder, you can view our webinars and tutorial videos on our YouTube channel. Is there a topic you’d like to learn more about? Let us know in the comments section below!

 

 

 

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10 Ways to Reduce Spam in Your Inbox

SpamBefore the invention of email, mail that arrived in your physical mailbox often contained pamphlets, sales brochures, credit card offers, and product catalogs. Much of this waste was thrown away and ended up in a landfill somewhere. Today, the equivalent and often more annoying nuisance is spam. Spam comes in many forms. Some examples include dubious product claims, miracle supplements, conspiracy theories, and offers of easy money.

Spam statistics are staggering. More than 100 billion spam messages are sent every day, representing around 85 percent of global email traffic.

So what can be done about this spam epidemic? There are numerous spam fighting tools in MDaemon and other mail servers, but server-side tools are only half of the spam-fighting equation. The other half is user education. With this in mind, here are 10 things users can do to reduce the amount of spam they receive.

  1. Unsubscribe – How often have you been asked by a store clerk for your email address or placed an order online? In either of these situations, chances are you may have ended up on a company’s mailing list. When you receive email from these companies, take the time to open the message and click on the Unsubscribe link. But first, make sure the email is in fact coming from a reputable company. If you’re not completely sure where the email came from, then report the message as spam instead of unsubscribing.
  2. Create a secondary email account – While we’re on the topic of retailers having your email address, you might also consider having a second email address that’s used solely for the purpose of store records or placing orders. This allows you to keep solicitations from these vendors out of your primary inbox.
  3. Keep your email address private – If your email address is visible on social networking sites like Facebook or Twitter, then it’s also visible to spammers. Spammers have tools that can easily detect visible email addresses and add them to their mailing lists. This is why it’s often recommended that, if you MUST use your email address on one of these sites, you mask it by changing its format. For example, type out “at” instead of using the “@” symbol.
  4. Before you join a list, make sure the list owner cannot sell your email address – If the list you’re joining has a privacy policy, read it thoroughly and make sure your information cannot be sold to a third party.
  5. Don’t reply to ANY spam or unsolicited marketing messages – Most spam messages use forged sender (return-path) addresses, so replying to a spam message will almost never result in the spammer getting your message. Replying to legitimate marketing messages tells the sender that your email address is valid, and thus, they may continue to send you spam.
  6. Never click on links – Often, when you click on a link in a spam email, it specifically identifies you to the spammer as having received the message. Not only can clicking links in spam messages identify you to the spammer; you can also end up getting infected with malware.
  7. Block Images – Even if you don’t click any links, an image opening in your email can alert spammers to a valid address. Spammers often try to be stealthy by inserting images that are only one pixel wide. If your mail client is configured to automatically open images, spammers can be alerted that your email address is valid. We recommend configuring your email client to automatically block images to reduce spam. You can always choose to view images in specific emails if you are sure the sender and content are legitimate.
  8. Make your email address unique – Spammers often use common names to try to guess email addresses. If your email address is unique, it makes it harder for spammers to guess your email address.
  9. Don’t fall for scams – If you receive an anonymous email from someone who appears to be in dire need, who promises you large sums of money for your small up-front investment, you may be witnessing the familiar Nigerian email scam, or one of many other variants. What are the odds that someone you’ve never met, who’s in a desperate situation, would contact you for help? Don’t fall for this scam.
  10. Never forward email from someone you don’t know – I often see email messages with some type of public service announcement, petition, or other bit of advice, and often, there’s a request to forward the message to your friends. Don’t fall for this, as it’s a prime opportunity for spammers to harvest email addresses.

Blocking junk email is not just the job of the mail server administrator. A well-informed email user can mean the difference between spam that is manageable and spam that is out of control. These ten tips will help you reduce spam, and help prevent you from becoming a victim to phishing or malware.

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Encryption Options for Keeping Your Private Email Messages Safe

Email encryption options with MDaemonIs your company prepared for the next big data breach? According to a study by Ponemon Institute, which surveyed 567 executives in the United States on how prepared they think their companies are to respond to a data breach, the following findings were made:

  1. Most respondents believe their companies are not prepared to deal with the consequences of a data breach.
  2. Most companies have data breach response plans, but they are ineffective.
  3. Data breach response plans are often not effective because they are not reviewed in a timely manner.
  4. Data breach detection technologies are rarely deployed.

Also, consider these startling enterprise email security statistics from Virtru’s blog:

  1. 87% of senior managers upload business files to a personal email or cloud account.
  2. Email malware creation is up 26% year over year, with 317 million new pieces of malware created in 2014.
  3. Hackers targeted 5 out of 6 large companies using email attacks last year — an annual increase of 40%.
  4. Cybercrime has a 1,425% ROI.

With the proliferation of data theft and compromised systems, more companies are addressing data privacy concerns via a renewed focus on security and encryption technology.

To address these data privacy and security concerns, MDaemon administrators and users have three options for keeping confidential email messages and attachments secure – SSL/TLS, Virtru, and OpenPGP. When an email message is sent, SSL or TLS is used to encrypt the connection from the mail client to the server or from the sending mail server to receiving mail server. Virtru provides end-to-end message and attachment encryption, and OpenPGP provides server-side encryption and key management as well as client-side encryption (when used with an OpenPGP plug-in on the mail client).

Encrypting the Connection with SSL or TLS

When you use POP or IMAP to retrieve your email messages, your username and password are transmitted in clear-text across the internet. This means that anyone using the same network or wireless connection as you, or anyone who has access to internet traffic at your ISP, can potentially intercept your data and read your login credentials. A hacker with malicious intent can then read your email, steal confidential information, or send out thousands of spam messages from your account. Your email credentials are valuable to spammers because the success rate of their solicitations is much greater than if they had simply forged the return-path of the message (which is characteristic of most spam messages).

One method for preventing hackers from being able to “sniff out” private data that’s in transit over the network is to use SSL or TLS. SSL and TLS are methods for encrypting the connection between two mail servers (SMTP) or between the mail server & mail client (POP & IMAP). In other words, the communication channel is encrypted – not the email message itself. A good explanation of SSL can be found here: https://www.digicert.com/ssl.htm

Normally, SMTP traffic is sent from client-to-server or server-to-server over port 25, but if you’d like the SMTP connection to be encrypted using SSL, by default you can configure your mail client to send outbound SMTP traffic over port 465, and you can also configure MDaemon or SecurityGateway to use port 465. Likewise, the default POP3 SSL port is 995, and the default IMAP SSL port is 993.

This knowledge base article contains instructions for configuring SSL features for SMTP, POP, and IMAP for MDaemon.
http://www.altn.com/Support/KnowledgeBase/KnowledgeBaseResults/?Number=841

This knowledge base article explains how to configure SSL features for SMTP & HTTP in SecurityGateway:
http://www.altn.com/Support/KnowledgeBase/KnowledgeBaseResults/?Number=481

When SSL or TLS is used, the data itself is not encrypted, but the connection is. If you’d like the data itself to be encrypted, then continue reading for how to encrypt email messages and attachments using Virtru and OpenPGP.

Client-Side Message & Attachment Encryption with Virtru

While SSL & TLS encrypt the connection, Virtru (included with MDaemon) encrypts the actual email message. Virtru provides end-to-end encryption – meaning the message is encrypted on the sending client and decrypted on the receiving client. Messages encrypted via Virtru are stored in their encrypted state on the server and cannot be decrypted without the proper keys. Virtru is included with MDaemon.

Click here for more information on Virtru.

Server-Side Message & Attachment Encryption with OpenPGP

With OpenPGP, messages are encrypted on the server, but they can also be encrypted on the mail client if an OpenPGP plug-in has been installed. The MDaemon administrator enables the OpenPGP features, creates public & private keys for users, and selects users who are allowed to use OpenPGP. Use the MDPGP configuration screen (located under the Security menu) to configure automatic encryption & key exchange, encryption key size and expiration, and to import keys. You can also create content filter rules to encrypt messages that meet specific criteria using OpenPGP.

This knowledge base article contains step-by-step instructions for enabling MDaemon’s OpenPGP features, configuring who can use it, and creating public & private keys for users.

Are These Features Easy to Use?

SSL and TLS are enabled by simply enabling the SSL ports on the mail server and configuring your mail client to use the SSL ports.

With Virtru, you’re up and running by simply enabling the feature in WorldClient. When you enable Virtru in WorldClient, your request is first sent to Virtru for processing. Within seconds, you’ll receive a pop-up message indicating that Virtru is now ready to start encrypting and decrypting your messages and message attachments. It’s that simple!

And for OpenPGP, options are available to help automate the encryption, decryption, and key import/exchange processes.

Conclusion

To recap, SSL & TLS can be used to help prevent eavesdropping on your email communication channel by encrypting the connection, while Virtru & OpenPGP can be used to help keep your email messages safe from unauthorized access by encrypting the actual email messages and attachments. Together, these security measures help to ensure that your confidential business data remains safe from unauthorized access.

Are you ready to ensure your important business communications are safe from prying eyes? Then download MDaemon and get started with SSL, Virtru, and OpenPGP!

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18 Email Safety Tips Every User Should Know

danger_phishing_scam_sq_1000

As mail server administrators, we may have extensive knowledge on how to use email safely and securely, but what about end users? You do everything you can to block spam & malware, but if you don’t educate your users and one of them clicks on a link in a spam message, your network can be made vulnerable. Consider these recent cases that could have been avoided if users were armed with the right information to identify phishing scams and other threats.

  •  CEO fraud (a scam in which the attacker spoofs the boss or CEO in order to trick someone into wiring funds to the scammer) and W-2 Phishing (in which scammers impersonate the boss in order to get access to employee tax forms) are being combined in new & more widespread attacks.
  • A malware development team known as The Dukes may have been responsible for targeting think tanks and NGOs in multiple spear phishing attacks. These attacks purported to be from individuals at Transparency International, the Center for a New American Security (CNAS), the International Institute for Strategic Studies (IISS), Eurasia Group, and the Council on Foreign Relations (CFR). In addition to these spear phishing attacks, other attacks included less-targeted spam email blasts that contained Word or Excel documents. The recipient is instructed to enable macros which, when enabled, allow hackers to automatically download and run malicious code.
  • Toy maker Mattel was hit with a phishing email requesting a new vendor payment to China. Their finance executive received the phishing email claiming to come from their new CEO. Standard protocol required two high-ranking officials to approve of these types of transactions. Because the finance executive and the CEO both qualified as high-ranking officials, she approved the transaction and wired over $3 million to the Bank of Wenzhou, in China. You can read more about this story here.

These are just a few high-profile incidents among many others that could have been prevented if the user had been better informed on email safety and security.

Email security isn’t just the email provider or administrator’s responsibility. It’s everybody’s responsibility. Here is a list of safety tips all mail server administrators should share with their users to help keep spam & malware to an absolute minimum

  • Change your password often.
  • Use strong passwords. Never use a password that contains “password” or “letmein”.
  • Use a different password for each of your accounts. If you use the same password for your bank account as you do for your email account, you become much more vulnerable to data theft.
  • Don’t open an attachment unless you know who it is from & are expecting it.
  • Be cautious about email messages that instruct you to enable macros before downloading Word or Excel attachments.
  • Use anti-virus software on your local machine, and make sure it’s kept up-to-date with the latest virus definitions.
  • If you receive an attachment from someone you don’t know, don’t open it. Delete it immediately.
  • Learn how to recognize phishing
    – Messages that contain threats to shut your account down
    – Requests for personal information such as passwords or Social Security numbers
    – Words like “Urgent” – false sense of urgency
    – Forged email addresses
    – Poor writing or bad grammar
  • Hover your mouse over links before you click on them to see if the URL looks legitimate.
  • Instead of clicking on links, open a new browser and manually type in the address.
  • Don’t give your email address to sites you don’t trust.
  • Don’t post your email address to public websites or forums. Spammers often scan these sites for email addresses.
  • Don’t click the “Unsubscribe” link in a spam email. It would only let the spammer know your address is legitimate, which could lead to you receiving more spam.
  • Understand that reputable businesses will never ask for personal information via email.
  • Don’t send personal information in an email message.
  • Don’t reply to spam. Be aware that if you reply to a spam email, your reply most-likely will not go back to the original spammer because the FROM header in the spam message will most-likely be forged.
  • Don’t share passwords.
  • Be sure to log out.

In many ways, your network is only as strong as its weakest link. Don’t be that weak link. In addition to the tools administrators use to keep unwanted threats out, user education is key to keeping your network secure.

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