MDaemon Technologies Announces New Email Security Gateway Services in the Cloud

SecurityGateway 6.0 with Archiving

The latest version 6.0 includes new cloud services, expanded Data Leak Prevention rules and integrated archiving features to help companies affordably protect user email.

Archiving Features in Security Gateway
Archiving Features in Security Gateway

MDaemon Technologies announced the release of SecurityGateway for email servers version 6.0 that includes a new enterprise class Security Gateway cloud service and fully managed dedicated servers for end users, MSPs, VARs, Systems Integrators, and IT Consultants. The flexible options of using either on-premise software or the new email security cloud services include an expanded and flexible set of Data Leak Prevention (DLP) rules to quarantine outbound messages and help protect a company from sending sensitive or confidential information via email.   And the addition of integrated email archiving at no additional cost provides customers with affordable, flexible and easy to use features to protect email servers located anywhere in the world.

Prevent leaks of sensitive data with Security Gateway
Data Leak Prevention in Security Gateway

“We are excited to bring our many years of email security expertise and management to offer customers and channel partners a new cloud service without the need for them to make expensive hardware and infrastructure investments,” said Kevin Beatty, Vice President of Marketing and Business Development. “By adding this new service, expanding our DLP features and integrating archiving without increasing the cost of the product, we continue to offer customers unmatched value.”

MDaemon’s SecurityGateway for Email Servers incorporates multiple antivirus engines and proactive Outbreak Protection technology to detect viruses, spam, phishing, spyware, and various types of Business Email Compromise threats. Along with inbound and outbound email quarantine features, SecurityGateway assures the accurate delivery and receipt of legitimate email.

To learn more or request a quote, visit Security Gateway for Email Servers.

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Another day, another attempt to scam me – but I know a phishing attempt when I see one!

Avoid phishing scamsIt’s just a fact of life: If there’s email, there will always be spam. Now, how much spam you have to deal with will depend on how good your spam filtering solution is. Here at MDaemon Technologies, we use our own products – MDaemon and Security Gateway, to filter out spam, malware, phishing attempts, and all of the other junk that often floods inboxes of users whose email server or hosted service isn’t as effective.

“If I have a good spam filter, do I REALLY need to know how to recognize phishing scams?”

If an email security company or hosted provider tells you their spam filter will catch 100% of spam, they’re not being completely honest. Most companies say their products catch 99% or 99.5% in their SLA (Service Level Agreement), with a false-positive rate of %.0001 or less. That’s reasonable and to be expected, especially considering the statistics.

According to public data, spam made up over 71% of global email traffic in April, 2014. As of September, 2018, spam volume had decreased to 54%, but considering that over 281 billion email messages are sent per day worldwide, that’s still over 151 billion spam messages sent every day, and while spam may be decreasing in total volume, it’s becoming more dangerous, with cryptojacking overtaking ransomware as the attack vector of choice for cybercriminals, and malware-as-a service turning cybercrime into a commodity for the masses,

So no matter how good an email security product is, there is always that chance that new and emerging (and sometimes tried-and true) social engineering techniques will succeed in tricking the next unsuspecting victim to part ways with his or her company’s bank account details.

And that brings me to the point of today’s post. It bears repeating that companies of all sizes and industries should consider ongoing training with their employees on how to recognize phishing attempts.

In today’s example, the scammer is using a classic BEC (Business Email Compromise) attack to try to get the recipient to open a malicious ISO file.

Phishing email using common Business Email Compromise tactics
Phishing email using common Business Email Compromise tactics

Because the threat of phishing and Business Email Compromise will continue well into the future, I will revisit this topic regularly throughout the year.

Meanwhile,  I would recommend sharing with all employees and business executives these 10 best practices for avoiding common email scams.

Business Email Compromise Protection Tips

 

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